Social housing residents

Residents need their voices heard in social housing

06 November 2018

The fire at Grenfell Tower in June 2017 led many commentators and residents to question whether social housing residents are adequately involved in decisions which affect their homes.

The government published a green paper in August which it says aims to ‘rebalance the relationship between residents and landlords, tackle stigma and ensure that social housing can be both a stable base that supports people when they need it and support social mobility’.

The government also launched a consultation into this and today, the London Assembly Housing Committee releases a report which will form its response to the consultation.

The report looks at how residents engage with their social housing in the capital. It also examines how the Mayor can influence the relationship between social housing landlords and their residents.

The recommendations include:

  • Support for the Government’s call to assess performance of social landlords
  • Appointing a social housing commissioner who sits on the Homes for Londoners board
  • Basing future GLA funding to social landlords for new affordable homes on improvements in transparency and management in their organisations

Author of the report, Chair of the Housing Committee, Sian Berry AM said:

'The Grenfell disaster is a tragic reminder that residents in social housing have a right to have their voices heard, especially when it comes to concerns they have about where they live.

'This can only begin if social housing landlords and residents have mutual respect.

'This report sets out a series of recommendations that encourage the Mayor to use his power to ensure good relationships between both parties can thrive.

'It’s imperative we avoid a breakdown between social housing landlords and their tenants.'

Notes to editors

  1. ‘Hearing resident voices in social housing’ report
  2. Sian Berry AM, Chair of the Housing Committee, is available for interviews.
  3. Housing Committee.
  4. As well as investigating issues that matter to Londoners, the London Assembly acts as a check and a balance on the Mayor.