MD1610 London Night Time Commission

Type of decision: 
Mayoral decision
Code: 
MD1610
Date signed: 
10 March 2016
Decision by: 
Boris Johnson MP (past staff), Mayor of London

Executive summary

As London is set to get 24-hour underground service, the capital needs to maximise the economic and social impact of a growing NTE. The UK’s night time economy (NTE) is worth £66bn a year to the national economy and employs 1.3m people. 

Approval, in principle ,  for expenditure of up to £90,000 is requested to establish a London Night Time Commission from March – October 2016 to undertake a:

a)    strategic review of policies and best practice for the NTE across London; and  
b)    report to the Mayor in October with key recommendations including the strategic areas where a Night Time Champion could add value to London’s NTE and promote a 24hr city.

 

Decision

That the Mayor approves expenditure of up to £90,000 to establish and fund the activity of a London Night Time Commission from March – October 2016. This will cover the costs of running the Commission, consultation, events and research requirements. 

 

Part 1: Non-confidential facts and advice

Introduction and background

 

1.1     In London, the NTE is recognised internationally ,attracting domestic and international visitors and is a key driver of the economic and cultural regeneration of town centres. The UK’s night time economy (NTE) is worth £ 66bn a year to the national economy and employs 1.3m people. 

1.2     There is currently no oversight of this critical part of London’s economy. As a result, the NTE can often be seen as the cause of noise and nuisance. A number of businesses have started to complain about intrusive measures which are damaging their operations and even leading to unnecessary closures.  London has lost 35% of live music venues since 2007. Pubs and night clubs are also closing down partly due to rising property values and licensing requirements. 

1.3     As London is set to get 24-hour underground service, the capital needs to get ‘24hour-ready’ to maximise the economic and social impact of a growing night time economy. Late night transport, policing, planning, licencing enforcement activities, street cleansing and the provision of emergency health services all contribute to keeping our streets safe, welcoming and clean, as well as achieving a balance between those out at night and others who want a good night’s sleep. The NTE can be managed in a pro-active and integrated way, balancing between these competing pressures.

1.4      London needs to act now to protect and manage the capital’s status as a 24hour city. Many European and Global cities are ahead on this. Amsterdam, Berlin and Paris have night time mayors.

1.5    We are in early discussions with Amsterdam City Council who have indicated they are interested in a comparative research study between the two cities.

 

Objectives and expected outcomes

2.1    The London Night Time Commission will result in:

i)    Completion of a comprehensive strategic review of London’s Night Time Economy (March-October 2016). The review will include research carried out by an external agency and will cover:

a)    an overview of current NTE activity by borough;
b)    review of existing policies which support or hinder the night time economy including planning, licencing and law enforcement;
c)    examples of best practice in London boroughs and competitor cities;
d)    analysis of barriers to growth for the night time economy;
e)    assessment of current and potential economic and social impact of night time economy;
f)    analysis of expanding times and geographical locations of London’s night time economy; and 
g)    analysis of potential areas of growth including skills development needs and apprenticeships.

ii)    Presentation of a report to the Mayor in October 2016 with key recommendations including the strategic areas where a Night Time Champion could add value to London’s night time economy and promote a 24hr city.

 

Equality comments

3.1    The Commission will take into consideration that the growth of the night time economy may impact groups in different ways, for example young Londoners, night shift workers (many of whom may be on low incomes), and residents. The commission will take this into account and encourage views from a wide range of equality groups representing those with protected characteristics to submit evidence.

 

Other considerations

4.1    The Night Time Commission will support the following Mayoral strategies:

i)    Protecting London’s international status, by highlighting investment opportunities within the NTE.

ii)    Maintaining London’s position as a world city for culture (Cultural Strategy policy 2) by assessing the 
    cultural offer within the Night Time Economy.

iii)    The London Plan (policy 4.7) recommends a strong partnership approach to ‘assessing the need and 
bringing forward capacity for retail, commercial, culture and leisure development in town centres’. 

4.2    MOPAC will contribute with targeted research generated by the Business Crime Change Board, in particular a review of the use of crime data for licensing purposes and consistency of licensing approach from MPS.

4.3    London First and Night Time Industries Association are exploring a joint commission on the economic impact on localised areas in London which will feed into the larger research by the Night Time Commission.

4.4    Consultation with a number of key stakeholders has been conducted including with London Councils and specific London Boroughs including Westminster, Camden and Wandsworth; as well as business associations including the West End Partnership, London First, the Night Time Industries Association. There has also been initial consultation with night time champions in Amsterdam and Berlin to learn from their schemes. 

4.5    The Commission will take into consideration that the growth of the night time economy may impact groups in different ways for example young Londoners, night shift workers and residents. The commission will take this into account and encourage views from a wide range of equality groups to submit evidence.

4.6    The following risks and mitigation actions have been identified in the IPB briefings:

Key Risks

Mitigation Actions

 

 

Delays in setting up the Commission

 

Key Stakeholders on board already, date for initial meeting set up as soon as funding is agreed.

 

 

Commission report is delayed

 

Research timetable and budget monitored regularly and clear and deliverable deadlines agreed.

 

 

The NTE is not seen as mayoral priority post-election

 

Assembly members across parties briefed and NTE as part of mayoral briefing.

 

 

 

Financial comments

5.1    Approval in principle is being sought for expenditure of up to £90,000 to establish and fund the activity of a London Night Time Commission from March – October 2016 as detailed in the report.

5.2    The costs will be incurred over 2 financial-years.  £15,000 is expected to be spent in 2015-16 and will be funded from the Communities and Intelligence minor programme budget. £75,000 is forecast to be spent in 2016-17 and will have first call on the Communities and Intelligence minor programme budget for 2016-17.

5.3    Discussions will take place with other commission representatives to seek financial support from partners. Any income raised will reduce the call on Communities and Intelligence minor programme budgets.

 

Investment and Performance Board

IPB considered the proposals for funding the London Night Time Commission and approved in principle expenditure of up to £90,000 on 17 February 2016.

 

Planned delivery approach and next steps

Activity

Timeline

Procurement of contract for research consultancy

March 2016

Announcement [if applicable]

March 2016

Delivery Start Date – Night Time Commission initial meeting

March 2016

Night Time Commission meeting

May 2016

Interim Report

July 2016

Night Time Commission meeting

July 2016

Final Report

October 2016

Night Time Commission final meeting

October 2016

Project Closure

October 2016