Gender pay gap report: March 2017 data

About the report

In 2017 the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) regulations came into force. This legislation requires public bodies with 250 or more employees to report on their gender pay gap by 31 March 2018. This is the first year where legislation requires the publication of such data, however the GLA was an early adopter and originally published an initial gender pay gap report in July 2016 and supplemented this with a more comprehensive and granular gender pay gap report in October 2016.

As a result of the GLA being a leader, and publishing its 2016 gender pay gap data in advance of the formal regulations being agreed, and the different calculation and reporting methodology used, the 2016 and 2017 reports are not directly comparable. These differences arise because the calculation and reporting methodology used for the 2017 report is fully in keeping with the regulations. In 2016 the GLA

  • included all staff including women that were on maternity leave/other staff on reduced pay
  • did not adjust salaries to take account of salary sacrifices for cycle to work or childcare vouchers,
  • did not include additional payments such as out of hours allowances or on call allowances and,
  • did not include details of any ‘bonus’ e.g. recognition payments

The current regulations require the above adjustments that were not made in 2016. For the purposes of this report all calculations are in accordance with the Government Guidance.
The GLA particularly welcomes the requirement for organisations to publish their gender pay gap information and to then develop action plans to address inequality in gender pay. The GLA is publishing alongside its 2017 gender pay gap report, its own action plan which sets out a programme of activity for the organisation to work towards addressing the gender pay gap.

The GLA is a single status organisation and does not have different staff groups. Salaries at the GLA are determined through a job evaluation scheme (Hay). Job evaluation evaluates the job and not the post holder. It makes no reference to gender or any other personal characteristics of existing or potential job holders. Therefore, we are confident that the GLA is paying the same salary to roles of equal value.

In line with the regulations the GLA is publishing their overall mean and median gender pay gaps. As a public sector body, the snapshot date for the data collection was 31 March 2017.
The data below represents the gender pay gap data for the Greater London Authority as at the end of March 2017. The data where appropriate has been broken down by both full-time and part-time staff. As at 31 March 2017 there were 816 employees in the GLA of which 797 are counted for gender pay gap reporting purposes. This represents 98% of staff. Of the 797 staff included in the data below 54% are women and 46% are men.

Overall gender pay gap summary

Table 1: overall gender pay gap, all staff (full and part-time)

  Overall median pay gap Overall mean pay gap
  Median hourly pay (all staff) Mean hourly pay (all staff)
Female £22.46 £23.83
Male £23.93 £26.19
Pay gap 6.14% 9.10%

Table 2: data by full time and part time

  Median hourly pay (full-time) Median hourly pay (part-time) Mean hourly pay (full-time) Mean hourly pay (part-time)
Female £22.22 £23.00 £23.80 £23.95
Male £23.93 £24.59 £26.16 £27.16
Pay gap 7.15% 6.47% 9.02% 11.82%

Quartile summary

The quartile data has been calculated in accordance with the methodology as set out in the regulations by “dividing the workforce into four equal sized groups and separating them according to the hourly pay rate, starting from lowest paid to the highest paid.” The Government adopted this approach in preference to calculating quartiles by dividing the overall pay distribution into four equal proportions. Splitting the data in equal groups by salary range could result in very small groups e.g. an entire quartile based on only the very highest earners’ salary and in some cases that could be a single person.

Table 3: quartile mean hourly pay

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
lower quartile £15.12 112 £14.65 88 -3.21%
lower middle quartile £21.07 120 £20.96 79 -0.52%
upper middle quartile £25.13 106 £25.08 93 -0.20%
upper quartile £36.80 90 £40.24 109 8.55%

The 2017 population is 199 (90 women and 109 men) with the upper quartile pay gap being 8.55%. Based on the numbers of staff at this level and the low turnover rate, addressing gender pay gap at the senior level is a long-term aim.

Table 4: quartile median hourly pay

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
lower quartile £15.65 112 £14.88 88 -5.17%
lower middle quartile £21.68 120 £21.68 79 0.00%
upper middle quartile £24.91 106 £24.61 93 -1.22%
upper quartile £34.12 90 £35.84 109 4.80%

For senior staff (upper quartile) the median pay gap in 2017 is 4.8%.

Grade summary

The GLA has chosen to analyse gender pay in relation to its grading structure as it believes that this level of analysis provides a more in depth look at the distribution of pay across the organisation. This level of examination can highlight issues which may be masked by the higher level analysis arising from the overall and quartile data.

Tables 5 and 6 below also show spot salaries and London’s Living Wage which are fixed rates not linked to defined spinal column points within the GLA’s grading structure. For the spot salaries and London’s Living Wage there is no progression up to or beyond the rate for each position compared to the other grades which each have five incremental steps within each grade.

Table 5: mean hourly pay by grade

Mean Hourly Pay
  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
London's Living Wage £9.75 8 £9.75 5 0%
Grade 1 £10.98 4 £12.32 4 10.87%
Grade 2 £13.06 12 £12.89 27 -1.25%
Grade 3 £14.05 1 £14.50 1 3.11%
Grade 4 £14.58 11 £14.36 4 -1.51%
Grade 5 £15.56 32 £15.57 20 0.07%
Grade 6 £17.43 62 £17.38 35 -0.29%
Grade 7 £20.79 47 £20.99 49 0.97%
Grade 8 £22.98 88 £23.04 52 0.27%
Grade 9 £25.12 55 £25.16 46 0.16%
Grade 10 £27.86 37 £27.94 37 0.29%
Grade 11 £30.50 27 £31.36 25 2.76%
Grade 12 £36.30 18 £36.19 26 -0.29%
Grade 13 £41.03 10 £41.87 8 2.03%
Grade 14 £43.89 5 £47.76 12 8.11%
Grade 15 £58.25 5 £57.90 8 -0.59%
Spot £66.82 5 £71.16 10 6.11%

The data shows a mean pay gap of 10.87% at Grade 1, an 8.11% pay gap at grade 14 and 6.11% for the highest earners on Spot salaries. Further analysis of the pay gap at Grade 1 is accounted for by one male member of staff acting up to a substantially higher grade therefore making his hourly rate much higher than his peers. This demonstrates how a very small number of higher earners, in this case one, can skew the outcomes when looking at the mean data. The mean pay gap at Grade 14 is due to five of the male staff receiving additional payments having an upward impact upon their hourly rates of pay. But for this there would be a virtually zero pay gap as 13 of the staff (10 men and 3 women) are all at the top of the scale with identical hourly rates of pay. Similarly, at the Spot salary level the three highest earners in the GLA are all men giving rise to a mean gender pay gap at this level.
 

Table 6: median hourly pay by grade

Median Hourly Pay
  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
London's Living Wage £9.75 8 £9.75 5 0%
Grade 1 £10.98 4 £10.98 4 0%
Grade 2 £13.27 12 £13.27 27 0%
Grade 3 £14.05 1 £14.50 1 3.11%
Grade 4 £14.83 11 £14.30 4 -3.70%
Grade 5 £15.25 32 £15.25 20 0%
Grade 6 £17.17 62 £17.17 35 0%
Grade 7 £20.68 47 £20.68 49 0%
Grade 8 £22.78 88 £23.35 52 2.44%
Grade 9 £25.11 55 £24.73 46 -1.54%
Grade 10 £27.68 37 £27.69 37 0.02%
Grade 11 £30.08 27 £31.06 25 3.15%
Grade 12 £35.34 18 £36.05 26 1.96%
Grade 13 £41.10 10 £42.68 8 3.71%
Grade 14 £44.62 5 £46.24 12 3.50%
Grade 15 £60.01 5 £58.45 8 -2.65%
Spot £65.44 5 £66.86 10 2.12%

£10,000 salary bands summary

In addition, the GLA is also publishing the distribution of salaries across female and male staff in £10k increments up to £100k with those earning more than £100k in one group. This broadly mirrors information published in the Mayor’s Annual Report except for the 19 staff specifically excluded for gender pay gap reporting. These tables contain information as at 31 March 2017.
 

Table 7: Distribution by gender in £10,000 increments

Number of staff by salary
  Female Male Total
  Number of staff Number of staff  
less than £20,000 8 5 13
£20,000 to £29,999 46 47 93
£30,000 to £39,999 105 71 176
£40,000 to £49,999 143 109 252
£50,000 to £59,999 73 63 136
£60,000 to £69,999 23 25 48
£70,000 to £79,999 11 13 24
£80,000 to £89,999 9 13 22
£90,000 to £99,999 0 3 3
£100,000 and over 10 20 30
TOTAL 428 369 797

Salary breakdowns

The table below shows the data broken down into equally sized salary groupings. These tables contain information as at 31 March 2017. Please note the information in the table below are not related to the GLA’s pay and grading structure. Whilst not necessary for gender pay gap reporting it provides an illustration of the gender distribution of the staffing population across the salary groupings. This ratio between the highest and lowest paid is 9.05:1 when GLA Apprentices are included in the information. GLA Apprentices are paid £18,811 per annum in accordance with London’s Living Wage. If this group are excluded the pay ratio changes to 8.03:1.
 

Table 8: Salary distribution by gender

  Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Totals
  £18,811-£56,687.50 £56,687.50-£94,563.50 £94,563.50-£132,439.75 £132,439.75-£170,316  
Male 283 68 13 5 369
Female 364 54 9 1 428
Totals 647 122 22 6 797

What's next?

This information will be updated annually in line with the regulations. To find out more about the GLA workforce composition please see the information on the  GLA workforce profile.