London Plan Annex 1: Opportunity and Intensification Areas

Annex One: Opportunity and Intensification Areas

To help improve access to policies in the London Plan and associated supporting text we have created an online version. Each policy has its own page, as do the sections of supporting text that are not directly associated with a specific policy. Our aim is to recreate the plan as accurately as possible; however this online plan has some variations:

  • The footnotes do not match the numbering in the plan as they begin at 1 on each webpage
  • The hyperlinks have been added for related policies
  • The display and formatting of tables and maps have been modified for online use

For the avoidance of doubt, this is an additional resource that does not replace the published London Plan. In the event that there are differences, the London Plan as published is always the definitive version.

A PDF version of the The London Plan Annex One: Opportunity and Intensification Areas can be found in the Related Documents section at the bottom of this page.

Introduction

A1.1  This Annex (which for the avoidance of doubt, forms part of the London Plan and therefore of the statutory development plan) is integral to policy 2.13 in Chapter 2, outlining how its broad principles should be applied to specific Opportunity and Intensification Areas including indicative estimates of employment capacity and minimum guidelines for new homes to 2031, subject to phasing.

A1.2  These estimates and guidelines are derived from a range of sources including the London Employment Sites Database (employment) and the London Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (homes); they will be tested through the preparation of planning frameworks and/or local development frameworks.

A1.3  It should be noted that in some Areas the transport system would not currently support this level of growth and developer contributions may be required to underpin enhancements. The Opportunity/ Intensification Area Planning Frameworks (OAPF/IAPF) for these areas can take different forms depending on local circumstances. Progress on their preparation and implementation will be reviewed in the London Plan Implementation Plan and is currently indicated in the Table below as (1) Proposed; (2) In Preparation; (3) Adopted; and (4) Under Review.

A1.4   The Mayor is working with boroughs and other partners to identify, assess and realise the potential for new Opportunity and Intensification Areas in terms of Policy 2.13 including in the London boroughs of Haringey (Haringey Heartlands), Sutton (Sutton Hospital), and Hounslow (Great West Corridor including the ‘Golden Mile’) and in the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames (Kingston town centre).

Table A1.1 Opportunity Areas

1 Bexley Riverside

Area (Ha): 1,347

Indicative employment capacity: 7,000

Minimum new homes: 4,000

OAPF progress: 1

Bexley Riverside relates to parts of Erith, Crayford, Slade Green and Belvedere. Improvements in public transport accessibility, especially associated with Crossrail 1 will provide scope for intensification, particularly around Abbey Wood. Account should be taken of the Area’s strategically important role in addressing London’s logistics requirements including protection for inter-modal freight transfer facilities at Howbury Park and safeguarded wharves on the River Thames, as well as waste management. East London Green Grid projects such as Belvedere Links will make a significant contribution to the improvement of landscape and green infrastructure. Any new development and infrastructure brought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects.

2 Bromley

Area (Ha): 69

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 2,500

OAPF progress: 1

Promote Bromley Town Centre’s strategic role as a Metropolitan town centre with a distinctive cultural, leisure and quality shopping experience and realise capacity for new residential development in line with its status as a new Opportunity Area. Sustainable growth should ensure a high quality, safe and accessible environment, and a vibrant day and night time centre, with high quality buildings, public spaces and strong east-west connections. Potential improvements to public transport accessibility should be considered in conjunction with the scope to optimise development capacity associated with the town centre and its environs. A carefully managed approach should be taken to enhance the business environment, modernise viable office provision and encourage the conversion or redevelopment of surplus office capacity to other uses including housing. 

3 Canada Water

Area (Ha): 46

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 3,300

OAPF progress: 2

Opportunity Area with good public transport accessibility including stations on the Jubilee and East London Line. The Area has significant potential for mixed-use regeneration on infill sites and intensification of existing commercial sites focussed on the transport interchanges and the District shopping centre. Subject to retail demand Canada Water may evolve to become a Major town centre in the network and the scope for a substantial increase in the minimum new homes target and employment capacity should be explored. There is also potential to develop a new science cluster linked to an academic institution (King’s College).

4 Charlton Riverside

Area (Ha): 176

Indicative employment capacity: 1,000

Minimum new homes: 3,500

OAPF progress: 4

Development at Charlton Riverside should be integrated with the wider development of the south bank of the Thames to complement opportunities at Deptford/Greenwich, Greenwich Peninsula and Woolwich. Any managed release of surplus industrial land should be set in a wider sub regional context as part of the planning framework for the Area, taking into account safeguarded wharves such as Murphy’s and Angerstein with its strategic railhead. Greenwich Council adopted the Charlton Riverside Masterplan in 2012 but more work is needed on possible release of land within the Strategic Industrial Location.

5 City Fringe/Tech City

Area (Ha): 901

Indicative employment capacity: 70,000

Minimum new homes: 8,700

OAPF progress: 2

London is the digital capital of Europe and the growing digital-creative cluster at Tech City, which extends from the Old Street ‘Silicon Roundabout’ Shoreditch to Whitechapel, Hackney Central and Dalston, has the potential to become a business hub of major international significance. The City Fringe/Tech City OAPF should nurture the employment, business and creative potential of the digital-creative sectors and ensure that suitable commercial floorspace, supporting uses and related infrastructure is available to meet the needs of this growing cluster. Securing affordable workspace, high quality digital connectivity and an attractive, ‘buzzy’ business environment are key considerations. The City Fringe/Tech City area contains a number of accessible, relatively central sites with significant development capacity, including Bishopsgate/South Shoreditch and Whitechapel/Aldgate. The Area also provides particular scope to support London’s critical mass of financial and business services and clusters of other economic activity, such as creative industries. The potential for a medical research cluster at Whitechapel associated with the Queen Mary University London should be explored. Minor extensions of the CAZ should assist the realisation of development capacity and exploit public transport accessibility through Crossrail 1 stations at Liverpool Street and Whitechapel and at the London Overground stations. At Old Street there is significant scope to improve the station and its environs, to become a more successful and attractive gateway to Tech City and encourage investment. The scale of additional development capacity here is partly dependent upon operational rail requirements and improvements to interchange capacity. The area contains some of London’s most deprived inner city neighbourhoods as well as affluent new quarters interspersed with affordable business premises, some serving the local communities, others meeting the needs of national and international business. Development should take account of the Tower of London World Heritage site. Improved public transport accessibility at Dalston Junction will support a range of development opportunities in this area. Potential exists to redevelop Kingsland Shopping Centre and secure better integration with its surroundings. Ridley Road Market is an important asset and there is scope to improve the overall environment and operation of the market and linkages with the High Street. The potential for intensification in the wider hinterland of Dalston should also be explored including sites along the A10 corridor and those in close proximity to the London Overground station at Haggerston.

6 Colindale/ Burnt Oak

Area (Ha): 262

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 12,500

OAPF progress: 4

An area comprising a range of sites with capacity mainly for residential-led mixed use, which are at various stages in the development process including parts of the former RAF East Camp adjacent to the M1, Hendon College site, the existing Grahame Park Estate, the Peel Centre, Colindale Tube and the Hospital and library sites to the west of tube. The area also includes major development sites in Brent along the Edgware Road at Oriental City, Zenith House and Capital Way. Co-ordination of adequate provision of social and transport infrastructure across the borough boundaries is required. Appropriate developer contributions are also needed to deliver public transport improvements to support the proposed intensification of residential use. Barnet Council adopted the Colindale Area Action Plan in March 2010. The Council intends to update the AAP through production of a Supplementary Planning Document.

7 Cricklewood/Brent Cross

Area (Ha): 324

Indicative employment capacity: 20,000

Minimum new homes: 10,000

OAPF progress: 3

Subject to office demand, a potential Strategic Outer London Development Centre (see Policy 2.16). Brent Cross /Cricklewood also has significant potential for wider economic development, new housing and regeneration, capitalising on public transport improvements including Thameslink and the Northern Line upgrade. The Area combines former railway lands and the wider hinterland surrounding Brent Cross regional shopping centre across the A406 North Circular Road. Brent Cross is to be redeveloped to become a town centre complementing the roles of other centres nearby and with an extended mix of town centre activities. This should include a significant increase in new housing together with local ancillary services. A rail station on the Cricklewood site is proposed and new development should be phased with improvements to public transport and accessibility. A site for a major waste facility within the area will form a key role in North London Waste Strategy. There is significant potential for improvement to the public realm including restoration of the River Brent.

8 Croydon

Area (Ha): 194

Indicative employment capacity: 7,500

Minimum new homes: 7,300

OAPF progress: 3

One of the potential Strategic Outer London Development Centres, Croydon is also recognised as London’s largest ‘Metropolitan’ town centre and one of the capital’s two strategic office centres outside central London. The council’s strategy will need to be built upon to re-brand the offer of Croydon to meet modern commercial needs, realising its competitive advantages and good public transport accessibility. This will entail consolidating its strengths as a strategic office location through mixed-use re-development and enhancements to the business environment. A carefully managed balance must be struck between modernising office provision and encouraging the conversion of surplus capacity to other uses including a significant increment to housing. An integrated approach to a number of sites will be needed, including East Croydon station, Fairfield Halls, Croydon College, Park Place and the Whitgift redevelopment (for which planning permission has been granted). Rejuvenation of the mix and vitality of supporting uses, enhancement of the environment and improvements to traffic management will help support redevelopment. The Croydon Town Centre Opportunity Area Planning Framework (OAPF) was adopted by the Mayor of London in January 2013. The framework was prepared in collaboration between the GLA, Croydon Council and TfL.

9 Deptford Creek/ Greenwich Riverside

Area (Ha): 165

Indicative employment capacity: 4,000

Minimum new homes: 5,000

OAPF progress: 1

The Area should benefit major concentrations of deprived neighbourhoods across the two boroughs and capitalise on its waterside and heritage character. Subject to resolution of wharf related issues, parts of Convoys Wharf should be developed for a range of uses. The Area as a whole has potential for a cultural quarter, for smaller scale leisure and tourism-related provision, business workspaces and additional housing. East-west connections across Deptford Creek should be addressed.

10 Earls Court & West Kensington

Area (Ha): 38

Indicative employment capacity: 9,500

Minimum new homes: 7,500

OAPF progress: 3

The Area presents a significant opportunity for regeneration comprising estate renewal and housing and employment growth. A comprehensive approach should be taken to planning the future of the exhibition complex, the Transport for London Lillie Bridge Road depot, the local authority housing estates and other sites in the vicinity. The potential for a strategic leisure, cultural and visitor attraction and strategically significant offices should be explored together with retail, hotels and supporting social infrastructure. To guide development in the Opportunity Area, a Joint Supplementary Planning Document has been prepared in partnership with Hammersmith and Fulham Council, Kensington and Chelsea Council and Transport for London. Earls Court has good public transport facilities and these should be further enhanced, together with comprehensive highway and streetscape improvements. Earls Court already benefits from a strong identity, distinctive townscape and a range of heritage assets, all of which should be upheld and promoted through the regeneration and growth of the area. 

11 Elephant & Castle

Area (Ha): 88
Indicative employment capacity: 5,000
Minimum new homes: 5,000
OAPF progress: 3

The Area is undergoing major transformation with significant investment in housing and potential for new retail provision integrated with a more efficient and attractive transport interchange. There is scope to create a series of connected public open spaces complemented by environmental and traffic management improvements. Resolution of these and rail related issues are crucial to the successful redevelopment of this southern gateway to central London.

12 Euston

Area (Ha): 85

Indicative employment capacity: 7,700 – 14,100 depending on station design and constraints

Minimum new homes: 2,800 – 3,800 depending on station design and constraints

OAPF progress: 3

Euston is a major national and commuter rail terminal possessing good bus and underground links to the rest of the Central Activities Zone. The station airspace and adjacent areas are underused and have potential for intensification. There is scope to re-configure Euston Square Gardens and the bus station to enhance this space and the transport interchange and also to develop the relationship with the adjacent university quarter. The ‘Euston Area Plan’ was adopted in January 2015. This has been produced by the GLA, working with TfL and Camden Council. This will help to shape change in the area over the next 15-20 years and provide a framework for planning decisions. This plan is being produced partly in response to the current proposal for a new High Speed rail link (HS2) from London to the North and Scotland and to reflect and update previous plans and aspirations for development in and around the station.

13 Greenwich Peninsula

Area (Ha): 259

Indicative employment capacity: 7,000

Minimum new homes: 13,500

OAPF progress: 3

The Peninsula plays two key strategic roles, as an internationally significant leisure attraction and as a major contributor to meeting London’s need for additional housing. The main focus of commercial development is at the north of the peninsula around the O2 Centre and the Jubilee Line station. Any release of industrial capacity should be managed in a sub-regional context and as part of the planning framework, recognising the roles of safeguarded wharves and the potential for a cruise liner terminal. River paths, parks and squares on the peninsula should contribute to a high quality public realm and become part of the wider East London Green Grid with potential to improve pedestrian and cycle linkages from the O2 to Greenwich town centre. Development and infrastructure provision should be co-ordinated with that in neighbouring Charlton Riverside.

14 Harrow & Wealdstone

Area (Ha): 177

Indicative employment capacity: 3,000

Minimum new homes: 2,800

OAPF progress: 3

This new Opportunity Area offers significant opportunity for urban renewal and intensification, providing the impetus to regenerate Wealdstone and rejuvenate Harrow town centre. Capacity exists to deliver substantial employment growth through an uplift in retail, office and hotel development within the town centres and the intensification of industrial and other business use within the Wealdstone Industrial Area. There is also scope to accommodate a substantial portion of the Borough’s future housing need through the delivery of higher density residential and mixed use development on key strategic sites and renewal areas where development is matched by investment in infrastructure and achieves high standards of design and sustainability.

15 Heathrow

Area (Ha): 700

Indicative employment capacity: 12,000

Minimum new homes: 9,000

OAPF progress: 1

The Mayor supports an integrated approach to the distinct environmental and growth issues facing the area around Heathrow both within and beyond London in the three corridors covered by the ‘Western Wedge’ (see para 2.17) and recognises the importance of the airport as a driver for economic growth within the opportunity area and beyond. He recognises the importance of maintaining its attractiveness to business, while enhancing its environmental performance in line with Policy 6.6 Aviation. It contains a range of locations with potential to contribute to economic development without a third runway, together with new housing and environmental improvement. Any new development and infrastructure brought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects. In Hillingdon, Heathrow ‘north’ (including the A4 corridor) will continue to benefit from airport related growth, particularly with regard to transport and logistics, business and hotels and leisure/tourism. Stockley Park has a particular draw for a diverse range of offices including marketing and R&D, and for prestigious national and European headquarters. Uxbridge is set to grow significantly with the redevelopment of the RAF Uxbridge site, together with potential in the bio-science sectors and creative/media support services in the Uxbridge Business Park. The Hayes-West Drayton corridor contains redevelopment opportunities for a range of potential uses, including small business parks, logistics and mixed-uses. Hayes town centre offers considerable scope for the creative/media sector and for SME workspace. In Hounslow, there is capacity to continue the rejuvenation of Feltham as a town centre and to develop the borough’s strategically important industrial offer. The capacity estimates indicate the broad potential of the Opportunity Area and are subject to more detailed testing.

16 Ilford

Area (Ha): 85

Indicative employment capacity: 800

Minimum new homes: 5,000

OAPF progress: 4

Ilford is both an Opportunity Area and a ‘Metropolitan’ town centre serving outer east London. There is scope to provide at least 5,000 additional homes on development sites in and around the town centre. Comprehensive redevelopment of key sites should reinforce its ‘Metropolitan’ centre role with improvements to the range and quality of the retail offer and build upon its strengths as a new leisure-oriented location to serve the wider area. Longer term development, which could include some office provision as part of a wider mix of town centre uses, will be assisted by improved transport links, particularly Crossrail 1 and the East London Transit.

17 Isle of Dogs

Area (Ha): 410

Indicative employment capacity: 110,000

Minimum new homes: 10,000

OAPF progress: 2

The north of the Isle of Dogs forms a strategically significant part of London’s world city offer for financial, media and business services and is recognised as part of the Central Activities Zone for office policy purposes, with Canary Wharf also functioning as a Major town centre for its workers and more local communities. Proposed transport investment including Crossrail 1 should allow it to accommodate an additional 110,000 jobs by 2031 focused on the area with particularly good and improving public transport accessibility and capacity in and around Canary Wharf. Partnership working is required to bring forward adequate land and a significant enhancement to transport capacity. Parts of the Area have significant potential to accommodate new homes and there is scope to convert surplus business capacity south of Canary Wharf to housing and support a wider mix of services for residents, workers and visitors. Retail provision in Canary Wharf has the potential to develop and serve a wider catchment, complemented by a broader range of civic, leisure and other town centre facilities. At Crossharbour there is potential for less car dependent, more sustainable development providing a wider range of uses.To address barriers to the delivery of development, consideration is being given to refining this framework. This will focus on realising local benefits arising from improvements in public transport across London;a reappraisal of the balance between housing and employment in light of changing commercial occupier requirements; the scope to extend the area covered by the framework further north to open up employment and housing opportunities, for example towards Poplar;the potential for greater synergies with other development partners; more effective coordination of social infrastructure, especially schools to support growing local needs; and exploring ways in which the town centre offer of Canary Wharf can be broadened as well as extended to reflect aspirations for it to develop into a Metropolitan centre.

18 Kensal Canalside

Area (Ha): 20

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 3,500

OAPF progress: 2

Kensal Canalside has significant development potential and an opportunity to promote regeneration in north Kensington and adjoining boroughs. The scope and scale of development as an Opportunity Area is dependent on resolution of a number of challenges and constraints. Improved public transport accessibility will be a major determinant of the final scale of development. Rail and canal corridors form barriers to north-south movement within and beyond the site and should be addressed to knit development into the surrounding townscape. Linkages with the Park Royal Opportunity Area and the potential strategic public transport infrastructure hub and interchange at Old Oak Common should be addressed. The opportunity to build over the railway tracks and to address constraints imposed by existing gasholders should be investigated.

19 King’s Cross-St Pancras

Area (Ha): 53

Indicative employment capacity: 25,000

Minimum new homes: 1,900

OAPF progress: 3

King’s Cross-St Pancras now functions as a European passenger gateway and has the highest public transport accessibility in London. This accessibility will improve further with the completion of Thameslink. A new commercial quarter is rapidly emerging. Planning permissions are being implemented in both Camden and Islington for high-density commercial development, office, retail, leisure and housing. There may be scope to consider linkages between the academic sector and businesses clustered in this location in conjunction with those in the neighbouring City Fringe/Tech City Opportunity Area. The implementation of development must capture heritage value, secure environmental quality and minimise car use. It is vital to integrate the major rail termini, underground station and brownfield sites with the regeneration of neighbourhoods in the wider area.

20 Lewisham, Catford and New Cross

Area (Ha): 815

Indicative employment capacity: 6,000

Minimum new homes: 8,000

OAPF progress: 1

This Area contains a series of centres with scope for intensification, regeneration and renewal. There is scope for further intensification in central Lewisham where strategically important regeneration is already planned. Projects such as the Kender Triangle gyratory removal and Lewisham Gateway will provide development opportunities, improve the public realm and raise design quality in the area. The scope to address poor legibility, severance and traffic congestion should be investigated. Projects such as Waterlink Way and Deptford Loop should be further developed together with wider environmental improvements such as extensions to the East London Green Grid.

21 London Bridge, Borough & Bankside

Area (Ha): 155

Indicative employment capacity: 25,000

Minimum new homes: 1,900

OAPF progress: 4

This Area has considerable potential for intensification, particularly at London Bridge station and its environs, complemented by improvements to public transport and interchange facilities, better pedestrian integration with the surrounding area and greater use of river passenger transport. There is scope to develop the strengths of the Area for strategic office provision as well as housing, especially in the hinterland between Blackfriars and London bridges. Mixed leisure and culture related development should enhance its distinct offer as part of the South Bank Strategic Cultural Area, and partners should work to develop and accommodate synergies with the existing centre of medical excellence. Account should be taken of the Tower of London World Heritage site and proposals for open space networks and transport and community infrastructure should be co-ordinated with those in the Waterloo and Elephant and Castle Opportunity Area and across borough boundaries.

22 London Riverside

Area (Ha): 3,000

Indicative employment capacity: 16,000

Minimum new homes: 26,500

OAPF progress: 2

Within the Area development will be focused on the Barking Riverside, Dagenham Dock, South Dagenham, Beam Reach, Beam Park and Rainham West sites with scope for intensification in Barking town centre, Rainham Village and South Hornchurch. The development strategy will include managed release of some surplus industrial land for housing and other complementary uses, and consolidating the offer of the remaining industrial land including promotion of a Green Enterprise District incorporating the London Sustainable Industries Park at Dagenham Dock. Any new development and infrastructure brought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects. Substantial improvements in public transport will be needed, building on plans for increased capacity on the C2C rail line, and East London Transit schemes to serve London Riverside, exploring the potential for additional stations, for example at Beam Park along the current rail corridor, and extended bus services. There is scope to improve connectivity by cycling and walking across the whole area and in particular through implementation of the East London Green Grid. It is also imperative to plan for long term flood risk management. The industrial areas at River Road, Rippleside, Dagenham Dock and Rainham Employment Area support a range of different businesses. Access to rail, river wharves, trunk roads and existing warehousing clusters support the provision of strategically important logistics facilities, including inter-modal freight transfer (potentially at Renwick Road/Ripple Road), as well as consolidating the strengths of modern manufacturing excellence.At South Dagenham, along the A1306 East, and in Rainham there is potential to deliver more compact, residential-led mixed urban communities. The core employment areas have the potential to be developed as a leading centre for innovation and high-tech manufacturing, and for the growth sector of environmental technology, for example at Dagenham Dock. Barking Riverside is London’s single largest housing development opportunity and the Mayor will continue to lobby for rail to the area which is necessary to deliver over 10,000 new homes. Development should create not just a good quality environment with a full range of community facilities, but a new urban quarter with a distinct character of its own and a highly attractive place to live. A draft London Riverside Opportunity Area Planning Framework (LROAPF) has been published.

23 Lower Lee Valley (including Stratford)

Area (Ha): 1,400

Indicative employment capacity: 50,000

Minimum new homes: 32,000

OAPF progress: 2

Currently this Area is the most important single strategic regeneration initiative for London and an urban renewal challenge of global significance securing the legacy of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Lower Lee forms the axis linking two nationally important growth corridors: the London-Stansted-Cambridge-Peterborough corridor to the north and the Thames Gateway to the east. Any new development and infrastructure brought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites), either alone or in combination with other plans and projects. A new Metropolitan centre will be focused on Stratford town centre and a rich mix of employment, housing and open spaces across the Lower Lee Valley. Stratford is recognised as one of the capital’s two strategic office centres beyond central London and a potential Outer London Strategic Development Centre with particular potential for office development. The area will contain a significant new residential community providing at least 32,000 new homes and potentially up to 40,000. There is estimated capacity for up to 50,000 new jobs including over 30,000 predominantly office jobs at Stratford City. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will accelerate the realisation of the vision for the Lower Lee Valley for it to become a vibrant, high quality and sustainable mixed use new city district set within an unrivalled landscape of high quality parkland and water features which should be co-ordinated with plans for long term flood risk management. Managed release of appropriate industrial sites for mixed-use development should be promoted, whilst retaining key industrial land, particularly in the Strategic Industrial Locations. Integration of the facilities and infrastructure provided for the 2012 Games with the surrounding areas, centres and communities are vital to the area’s long term regeneration and success (See Policy 2.4). The Mayor’s planning priorities for the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and the surrounding areas are set out in Policy 2.4 of this plan and the Olympic Legacy Planning Supplementary Guidance (OLSPG). This is now being taken forward through a DPD prepared by the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC).

24 Old Kent Road

Area (Ha): 114

Indicative employment capacity: 1,000

Minimum new homes: 2,500

OAPF progress: 1

This is a new Opportunity Area with significant potential for residential-led development along the Old Kent Road corridor. The employment and minimum homes figures above should be explored further and refined in a planning framework for the Area and through a review of the Strategic Industrial Location and capacity to accommodate a phased rationalisation of its functions in the opportunity area or reprovision elsewhere.

25 Paddington

Area (Ha): 38

Indicative employment capacity: 5,000

Minimum new homes: 1,000

OAPF progress: 3

Significant office and residential development provision has already been made in the Area and there is scope for further high density, good quality, business and housing development. This should complement Paddington’s distinct canal-side character, enhance environmental quality, support low car use and integrate with surrounding neighbourhoods.

26 Park Royal

Area (Ha): 713

Indicative employment capacity: 10,000

Minimum new homes: 1,500

OAPF progress: 2

Park Royal is one of London’s key industrial locations, with potential to meet modern logistics and waste management requirements as well as other industrial type functions. A range of opportunities exist for industrial related development and in selected locations outside of SIL for mixed-use intensification where there is good public transport accessibility. These selected locations include a series of ‘gateway’ sites identified in the Park Royal OAPF comprising the Eastern Gateway at Willesden Junction, the Southern Gateway around North Acton station, the Western gateway around the Diageo First Central site and the Northern Gateway centred around the Northfields industrial estate. Development should take account of London’s future rail and water freight requirements and their land use implications, and the scope for improvements in strategic rail accessibility. Planning for Park Royal should be integrated with Old Oak Common and take into account the relationships with White City and Kensal Canalside Opportunity Areas.

27 Old Oak Common

Area (Ha): 155

Indicative employment capacity: 55,000

Minimum new homes: 24,000

OAPF progress: 2

Old Oak Common has significant regeneration potential for new housing and jobs and could make a major contribution to London’s position as a world business centre. Regeneration would centre on a new strategic public transport infrastructure hub at Old Oak Common on the HS2 line between London, and Birmingham and beyond with an interchange with Crossrail 1, other national main lines and the London Overground. This should include a new branch of Crossrail 1 linking from Old Oak to the West Coast Main Line and extending via Wembley to Watford and potentially beyond. Provision of public transport infrastructure on this scale would drive substantial development which could yield 24,000 new homes and, subject to capacity and demand, up to 55,000 jobs and a variety of complementary and supporting uses in a commercial hub around the station and in the wider area. The potential for a network of new open spaces and green links connecting Old Oak Common station to North Acton, Willesden Junction, Wormwood Scrubs and the Grand Union Canal should be investigated. Public transport accessibility and availability of amenity space should support high density development which could include a cluster of tall buildings around the interchange. Wormwood Scrubs would provide a major amenity to support this scale of development and improved access to the Scrubs is essential to deliver sustainable residential communities. Planning for Old Oak Common should be integrated with the wider Park Royal Opportunity Area, including scope for business relocations. Linkages with Kensal Canalside and White City Opportunity Areas should also be considered, including the Imperial College campus expansion and associated potential for business creation and development at Old Oak/Park Royal. A vision document for Old Oak was published in June 2013 setting out a direction of travel for the future development of the area.

28 Royal Docks & Beckton Waterfront

Area (Ha): 1,100

Indicative employment capacity: 6,000

Minimum new homes: 11,000

OAPF progress: 2

The Royal Docks will return to its former glory at the forefront of international trade and exchange. The regeneration of Silvertown Quays, Royal Albert Dock and Royal Albert Basin should build upon innovative and iconic developments such as the Siemans Crystal and the Emirates Air Line cable car. The Enterprise Zone will support its role as a world class business destination with capacity for at least 6,000 jobs. Joint public and private investment will create London’s first Asian business park. The potential for a new ‘floating village’ should be explored as part of the Royals’ potential to accommodate at least 11,000 new homes. Key issues to be addressed include maximising the benefits of the Crossrail station at Custom House, future growth of London City Airport, capitalising on the success of ExCel and its potential as a focus for further visitor/business related growth and improving connections to London Riverside. For Thameside West, strategic development principles are set out in the adopted Lower Lee Valley OAPF. Thameside East, West and Beckton Waterfront are also key locations for river-related industries. The management of safeguarded wharves, including scope for consolidation, will be an important issue in realising the potential of these sites.

29 Southall

Area (Ha): 87

Indicative employment capacity: 3,000

Minimum new homes: 6,000

OAPF progress: 3

The Area provides great scope to enhance the local environment and complement Southall’s current strengths, including its ethnic identity and links with South Asia, by introducing a more diverse retail offer and securing a substantial uplift in housing capacity as well as improvements in social infrastructure. The imperative to deliver genuine linkages between the Southall Gas Works site and the existing Southall town centre must be secured. Integration with the wider area including Hillingdon to the west needs careful consideration. Any new development and infrastructure bought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects.

30 Thamesmead and Abbey Wood

Area (Ha): 811

Indicative employment capacity: 4,000

Minimum new homes: 3,000

OAPF progress: 4

The residential environment and capacity of Thamesmead should be enhanced through estate renewal integrated with strategic opportunity sites for new housing, social and recreation facilities together with improved open space and Metropolitan Open Land. Access to the riverside and adjacent spaces in Tripcock Park should be enhanced, together with measures to secure better use of landscape assets such as the Ridgeway and improved local connections through the South East London Green Chain. In view of the low lying nature of parts of the Area, particular attention should be given to flood risk management. There is scope to enhance employment capacity in the White Hart Triangle and other industrial sites, including waste management and logistics provision.

31 Tottenham Court Road

Area (Ha): 19

Indicative employment capacity: 5,000

Minimum new homes: 500

OAPF progress: 3

There is significant potential for integrated renewal across Westminster and Camden borough boundaries recognising the Area’s strategic role as part of one of London’s two ‘International’ shopping locations in the context of the West End Special Retail Policy Area, as well as addressing more local concerns. This will include enhancing the public realm of St. Giles, Tottenham Court Road and eastern Oxford Street and providing better connection between Covent Garden, Oxford Street and Bloomsbury. 

32 Upper Lee Valley

Area (Ha): 3,900

Indicative employment capacity: 15,000

Minimum new homes: 20,100

OAPF progress: 3

The Upper Lee occupies a strategic position in the London-Stansted-Cambridge-Peterborough growth corridor and provides a range of development opportunities including the growth points at Tottenham Hale, Blackhorse Lane, Central Leeside and Ponders End which are considered suitable for higher density development and accessible sites within and on the edges of town centres, especially in the A1010 corridor. A four trains per hour service on the West Anglia Main Line and potential four tracking of the London Stansted line will be important in unlocking development capacity, particularly at Meridian Water. Development in the Opportunity Area should provide the stimulus for regeneration in existing communities including those in Edmonton, the Tottenham corridor to Stoke Newington and around Blackhorse Lane. Proposals should be co-ordinated with those for the Lower Lee Valley Opportunity Area. Adequate capacity should be retained to meet industrial needs including waste management and strategic logistics functions. The potential for the establishment of a Green Enterprise District should be explored. Any new development and infrastructure bought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects. The location, construction and design of new development and infrastructure should avoid significant and cumulative impacts on European biodiversity sites. The Lee Valley Regional Park Authority and water utilities should collaborate with relevant boroughs in relating development to the environmental assets of the Lee Valley Park and planning for long term flood risk management. Opening up the reservoirs to the public would enhance connections east to west across the valley and increase use of the Regional Park and its water spaces. London’s largest waste facility is located at Edmonton Eco Park and this facility has potential to provide heat and power to neighbouring developments. Improvements to capacity of the underground station, new bus infrastructure and services are needed to deliver higher density, mixed-use development. The Upper Lee Valley Opportunity Area Planning Framework (ULV OAPF) was adopted by the Mayor in July 2013. It has been produced by the GLA working with TfL and the London Boroughs of Enfield, Haringey, Waltham Forest and Hackney.

33 Vauxhall, Nine Elms, Battersea

Area (Ha): 227

Indicative employment capacity: 25,000

Minimum new homes: 20,000

         OAPF progress: 3

         As an integral part of the CAZ, this Area has scope for significant intensification and increase in housing and commercial capacity, with a new diplomatic quarter, parkland and river crossing for pedestrians and cyclists. To deliver the area’s full development potential will require major transport investment and construction of the Northern Line extension into the area is scheduled to commence in 2016. This investment will support an uplift in employment capacity for up to 25,000 jobs and a minimum homes capacity of at least 20,000. The Battersea Power Station site has the potential to become a new CAZ Frontage with potential for strategically significant mixed use development including residential, business, leisure, retail and service uses. Parts of the area may be suitable for tall buildings subject to London Plan/LDF design policies and criteria. The extensive area of low density, low value industrial uses at Nine Elms conflicts with wider strategic objectives for CAZ and industrial uses should be rationalised whilst sustaining capacity for those which are of particular importance to CAZ and capable of operating more intensively, such as the wholesale market and waste management provision. This Plan continues the requirement of the 2008 version of the London Plan to de-designate part of the historic Strategic Industrial Location in order to facilitate re-development. Safeguarded wharf capacity on the River Thames should continue to perform a key functional role and the use of waste to generate heat and power for developments should be investigated. Stronger traffic management and easier pedestrian and cycle movement will contribute to significant environmental improvements in this location. In March 2012, the Mayor adopted a planning framework for the Vauxhall / Nine Elms / Battersea Opportunity Area and it forms Supplementary Planning Guidance to the London Plan.

34 Victoria

Area (Ha): 47

Indicative employment capacity: 4,000

Minimum new homes: 1,000

OAPF progress: 3

The station, the airspace above its tracks and approaches, and nearby sites have significant potential for mixed-use intensification, capitalising on enhancement to the public transport interchange and improvements to accessibility and capacity. The need to enhance important heritage features and delivery of improvements to the wider public realm will need careful management. Significant new development around Gatliff Road reflects the potential for closer synergy with the Vauxhall/Nine Elms/Battersea Opportunity Area south of the river.

35 Waterloo

Area (Ha): 78

Indicative employment capacity: 15,000

Minimum new homes: 2,500

OAPF progress: 3

The Area provides opportunities for intensification of commercial, residential and cultural facilities associated with a major transport hub, a major office location and a Strategic Cultural Area (see Policy 4.6). There is potential to enhance the South Bank and extend the cultural and entertainment offer as a major London visitor destination which can also be enjoyed by local residents and employees. This should be carefully managed to take account of local residential and other needs. In the short to medium term, reuse of the former International Station will provide significant new facilities and increased capacity for the station and the area, as well as expansion of rail services. In the long term, the station presents a major development opportunity.

36 Wembley

Area (Ha): 239

Indicative employment capacity: 11,000

Minimum new homes: 11,500

OAPF progress: 3

New housing and leisure-related development should be integrated with the iconic and world-class stadium and other facilities, including the Arena and Conference Centre. Supported by upgrades to the three stations, improved public transport will play a key role in managing heavy demand for mass movement, links between the stations and the strategic leisure facilities should be improved. Development should contribute to the regeneration, vitality and viability of Wembley as a town centre, including its expansion eastwards. This should create a new community of shops, much enhanced public spaces, including Brent Council’s new Civic Centre, and 11,500 new homes. Proposals should enhance permeability and connectivity to the wider hinterland and the potential to locate a civic facility including a school adjacent to Olympic Way should be explored.

37 White City

Area (Ha): 110

Indicative employment capacity: 10,000

Minimum new homes: 6,000

OAPF progress: 3

An area undergoing substantial change within which completion of strategically significant new retail provision at Westfield has raised the status of Shepherd’s Bush to a Metropolitan town centre. The BBC is consolidating its activities within the area and this will create opportunities for further development, building upon the area’s strengths in creative, media and entertainment business. There is potential for mixed density housing and a focal point for office development at and around the tube stations at White City and Wood Lane with other commercial, leisure, open space, education and retail uses of appropriate scale to support the local community. This will be facilitated by de-designation of the historic strategic industrial location complemented by provision for waste and other industrial functions in the Park Royal Opportunity Area. The scope to improve connectivity with the wider area should be explored and development should be related to improvements in public transport capacity. Housing-led intensification should support local regeneration, enable estate renewal and seek a mixed and balanced community. There may be scope to enhance education and research capabilities in the area linked in particular to healthcare and bio-technology. Development should promote the vitality of the town centre, particularly in the Shepherd’s Bush market area, and complement the viability of other west and central London centres. An Opportunity Area Planning Framework has been adopted by the GLA and the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham which sets out further strategic principles including the appropriate scale, location and mix of uses taking into account studies of the creative industries, development and transport capacity. It also proposes a new public space – White City Green.

38 Woolwich

Area (Ha): 77

Indicative employment capacity: 5,000

Minimum new homes: 5,000

OAPF progress: 3

Building on existing and proposed transport infrastructure including Crossrail, and realisation of the boroughs substantial residential capacity, Woolwich could evolve to perform a higher role in the town centre network, which subject to implementation of the OAPF, could merit Metropolitan status. Implementation of proposals for the Royal Arsenal is also raising the profile of Woolwich and encouraging the wider regeneration of the town centre. Attractive links have been completed between the Arsenal and the town centre and should be complemented by further high-quality design and environmental improvement across the town and the A206 corridor, including General Gordon and Beresford Squares. There is potential to improve links with the South East London Green Chain and neighbourhoods to the south.

Table A1.2 Intensification Areas

   

39 Farringdon/ Smithfield

Area (Ha): 23

Indicative employment capacity: 2,500

Minimum new homes: 850

IAPF progress: 4

This is an Area with potential for intensification on a number of sites and broader improvements to the public realm and mix of uses. These will be supported by Crossrail and the Thameslink programme at Farringdon. The scale of additional development capacity is dependent on operational rail requirements, the degree of station renewal and improvements to transport and interchange capacity. The potential for bridging over the railway cutting to expand development capacity and public space provision should be explored. Development should be set in the context of the long term consolidation of London’s wholesale markets. Further opportunities for intensification are presented at Mount Pleasant. The Mayor encourages collaborative working between the three boroughs to refine the extent, opportunities and potential capacity of this Area.

40 Haringey Heartlands/ Wood Green

Area (Ha): 50

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 1,000

IAPF progress: 3

A range of development opportunities on the railway and former industrial lands to the south-west of Wood Green town centre with significant potential for improvement building on the area’s industrial heritage. Phases of residential and mixed-use development at Hornsey waterworks sites have been completed. Other key sites with development potential include the Clarendon Road gas works and adjacent Coburg Road industrial area. Mixed-use regeneration of these sites adjacent to Wood Green town centre should support delivery of the full range of uses. Site assembly and provision of better links with the town centre and Alexandra Park are key to comprehensive development. Opportunities should be explored to redevelop parts of Wood Green town centre for high-density, mixed-use schemes and strengthen pedestrian connections to the town centre and library. Any new development and infrastructure bought forward in this area must avoid adverse effects on any European site of nature conservation importance (to include SACs, SPAs, Ramsar, proposed and candidate sites) either alone or in combination with other plans and projects.

41 Holborn

Area (Ha): 13

Indicative employment capacity: 2,000

Minimum new homes: 200

IAPF progress: 4

Improved public transport accessibility and capacity should support selective intensification through mixed-use redevelopment at higher densities. The area has the potential to benefit from links with the nearby Tottenham Court Road Opportunity Area and Crossrail 1 station.

42 Kidbrooke

Area (Ha): 109

Indicative employment capacity: 400

Minimum new homes: 2,500

IAPF progress: 3

This area is focussed on Kidbrooke rail station and the Ferrier housing estates together with adjoining housing sites, open space and recreation facilities. The adopted SPD identifies capacity for at least 4,400 homes (gross) or a net addition of 2,500 homes. An outline planning approval has been granted for a total of 4,800 (gross) residential units. Development will be integrated with the station, providing improved bus links to north Greenwich, and with the surrounding area and across existing roads and rail links. 

43 Mill Hill East

Area (Ha): 48

Indicative employment capacity: 500

Minimum new homes: 2,000

IAPF progress: 3

Redevelopment opportunities exist around the Underground station, principally at the MOD Inglis Barracks and council depot sites. Barnet Council has published an Area Action Plan and development is primarily to comprise new housing at higher densities, with a mix of uses to provide local employment, community facilities, open space and servicing.

44 South Wimbledon/ Colliers Wood

Area (Ha): 122

Indicative employment capacity: 500

Minimum new homes: 1,300

IAPF progress: 4

This location contains a range of major opportunities for intensification including South Wimbledon and Colliers Wood. Any new development and infrastructure bought forward in this area must have regard to the strategic flood risk assessment. The potential for redevelopment and reconfiguration of the edge-of and out-of-centre retail parks at Colliers Wood to contribute towards the establishment of an integrated town centre along with improvements in public transport and local accessibility should be explored. 

45 West Hampstead Interchange

Area (Ha): 18

Indicative employment capacity: 100

Minimum new homes: 800

IAPF progress: 4

A significant inner London transport interchange with potential to improve connections between rail, underground and bus and to secure an uplift in development capacity through intensification.