Mayor and London Assembly host fifth Citizenship ceremony at City Hall

20 May 2013

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson and Chair of the London Assembly, Darren Johnson, co-hosted the fifth London Citizenship Ceremony at City Hall today.

Thirty eight new citizens were welcomed to City Hall, representing London’s 32 boroughs, some as families. New citizens attending received a certificate and gift of commemoration of their British Citizenship, and were watched by family and friends.

The Mayor Boris Johnson welcomed the new residents to London and said “Immigration has always played a crucial role in London’s cultural vitality and economic success. This annual ceremony is about encouraging citizens to get fully involved in their local communities and contribute to the future of their new city. Many congratulations to all 38 new citizens and their families.”

Chair of the London Assembly, Darren Johnson also said “I am delighted to welcome London’s newest citizens to City Hall, and proud that they have chosen to make my country their own. The whole of the UK benefits from the incredible dynamism that migrants bring to our country and nowhere is this more evident than in London”

The ceremony was administered by Head of Registration and Nationality Services for Brent and Barnet, Mark Rimmer OBE, who said “I am delighted that the Mayor has decided to host another Citizenship Ceremony and I am honoured to have been requested to conduct the ceremony at City Hall once again”

“Having the opportunity to welcome new British citizens is a real privilege and I know that our new citizens will be thrilled to be part of such a prestigious event. I have presided over a huge number of ceremonies and continue to be humbled by the enthusiasm, warmth and commitment that our new British citizens display at these events.”

Ends

Notes to editors

1. Slightly different from previous years, when one new citizen per London borough has been invited to attend by the Home Office, this year’s ceremony was attended by five families, all becoming new citizens together.

2. Before 2004, an oath or affirmation of allegiance was made privately in the presence of a person who had the power to witness oaths and a certificate of registration or naturalisation as a British citizen was then sent to the successful applicant by post

3. In 2004 citizenship ceremonies were introduced. New citizens who attend a ceremony are required to make an oath of allegiance (or affirmation) and a pledge.

4. The oath of allegiance is: ‘I (name) swear by Almighty God that on becoming a British citizen, I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, her Heirs and Successors, according to law.’

5. Affirmation of allegiance is: ‘I (name) do solemnly, sincerely and truly declare and affirm that on becoming a British citizen, I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Second, her Heirs and Successors, according to law.’

6. Pledge is: ‘I will give my loyalty to the United Kingdom and respect its rights and freedoms. I will uphold its democratic values. I will observe its laws faithfully and fulfil my duties and obligations as a British citizen.'