MD2382 Publication of the Culture Strategy

Type of decision: 
Mayoral decision
Code: 
MD2382
Date signed: 
27 November 2018
Decision by: 
Sadiq Khan, Mayor of London

Executive summary

The Mayor is required to prepare and publish a Culture Strategy which contains his policies related to culture, media and sport. The Culture Strategy is set out in two parts, the culture section (Culture for all Londoners) and the sport section (Sport for all of Us).

Culture for all Londoners:

On 23 March 2018 the Mayor published Culture for all Londoners, and an Integrated Impact Assessment (IIA) for public consultation. The consultation ran for 12 weeks, closing on 20 June 2018. This Mayoral Decision (MD) summarises the consultation and public and stakeholder engagement that took place and makes officers’ recommendations as to proposed changes.

Sport for all of Us:

On 20 July 2018 the Mayor published the draft sport section Sport for all of Us, and IIA for public consultation. The consultation ran for 12 weeks, closing on 12 October 2018. This MD summarises the consultation and public and stakeholder engagement that took place; and makes officers’ recommendations as to proposed changes.

The Mayor is asked to approve the final version of the Culture Strategy, having considered the consultation response reports and other associated documents, and to proceed to formally lay it before the Assembly.

Decision

The Mayor is requested to:

1. Approve the final recommended version of the Culture Strategy, which is composed of the culture section (Culture for all Londoners- appendix A) and the sport section (Sport for all of Us – appendix E) in accordance with sections 41, 42B and 376 of the Greater London Authority Act 1999 which outlines a strategy covering policies related to culture, media and sport having had regard to and taking into account the Report to the Mayor on the consultation on the draft Culture for all Londoners and the Sport for all of Us sections of the Culture Strategy (appendices B and F respectively) and the IIAs (appendices D and H respectively).

2. Note the Implementation Plans for both culture and sport sections that will be published separately from, but at the same time as, the Culture Strategy (appendices C and G respectively).

Part 1: Non-confidential facts and advice

Introduction and background
  1. The Mayor is required to publish a Culture Strategy which contains his policies relating to culture, media and sport. The culture and sport elements of the strategy have been developed as distinct sections. This Mayoral Decision is for both sections, bringing them together for final publication as the Culture Strategy.

 

  1. Under the Greater London Authority Act 1999 (“the GLA Act 1999”) the Mayor’s Cultural Strategy Group for London (known as the Mayor’s Cultural Leadership Board (“MCLB”) must formulate and submit to the Mayor a draft Culture Strategy, containing proposed policies with respect to culture, media and sport in Greater London.

 

  1. Pursuant to the GLA Act 1999, the MCLB is required to keep the strategy under review and may submit proposed revisions of it to the Mayor, following a consultation with designated consultative bodies. Ahead of the publication of each section of the draft Culture Strategy, the MCLB consulted the consultative bodies pursuant to section 376 (4A) of the GLA Act 1999 (as set out in MD2259 and MD2327).

 

  1. The Culture Strategy, as with all the other Mayoral strategies, has been revised to reflect the priorities and direction set out by the Mayor in A City for all Londoners, which the Mayor published in October 2016. These priorities included accommodating good growth, providing more housing, supporting the economy, improving the environment, transport and public spaces, access to culture, bringing people together through the power of sport, supporting social integration

 

  1. The Strategy has been prepared with engagement with other strategy teams within the GLA, covering all other statutory strategies including:

 

  • London Environment Strategy;
  • London Plan;
  • Mayor’s Transport Strategy;
  • Housing Strategy;
  • Economic Development Strategy;
  • Health Inequalities Strategy;
  • Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Strategy and
  • Police and Crime Plan.

 

 

Culture Strategy Consultation Process

 

  1. The Mayor approved the draft culture section and IIA report for public and stakeholder consultation (MD2259). It was published on 23 March 2018, and the consultation ran for 12 weeks, closing on 20 June 2018. The draft sport section followed the same process and the Mayor approved the draft sport section and IIA for public and stakeholder consultation. Public consultation ran from the 20 July until 12 October 2018 (MD2327).

 

  1. Section 42 of the GLA Act 1999 provides that when revising any mayoral strategy, the Mayor must consult the following:

 

  • The Assembly;
  • The functional bodies;
  • Each London borough Council;
  • The Common Council of the City of London;
  • Voluntary bodies some or all of whose activities benefit the whole or part of Greater London;
  • Bodies which represent the interests of different racial, ethnic or national groups in Greater

London;

  • Bodies which represent the interests of different religious groups in Greater London; and
  • Bodies which represent the interests of persons carrying on business in Greater London.

 

  1. The consultations were conducted in accordance with the statutory requirement regarding consultation. A consultation and public and stakeholder engagement programme was devised and implemented to ensure that stakeholders and the public were provided sufficient information to facilitate meaningful and constructive feedback.

 

 

Culture section: Culture for all Londoners

 

  1. Culture for all Londoners puts people and places at its heart. The Mayor’s vision is a city of immense opportunity, in which every child, young person and adult deserves the chance to enrich their lives through culture. Culture for all Londoners went out for public consultation in March 2018.  

 

  1. Culture for all Londoners (appendix A) is themed around four recommended priorities:

 

  • Love London - more people experiencing and creating culture on their doorstep;
  • Culture and Good Growth – supporting, saving and sustaining cultural places and spaces;
  • Creative Londoners – investing in a diverse creative workforce for the future; and
  • World City – a global creative powerhouse today and in the future.

 

  1. To deliver the Mayor’s strategy for culture in London, he will work with a range of communities, strategic partners, agencies and organisations. He will lever his powers and encourage cross policy collaboration to achieve greater impact and deliver his vision.

 

Previous Decisions

 

  1. An earlier MD (MD2129) for the Culture for all Londoners strategy production provided approval for expenditure of £121,000 to support research, development, consultation and delivery of the strategy and associated programmes for culture.

 

  1. A previous decision (MD2259) agreed to the publication of the draft Culture for all Londoners, and the associated Integrated Impact Assessment, for a three-month consultation period. The MD also agreed for expenditure of £30,000 from the 2018/19 culture strategy budget for the delivery of consultation activities and research for the final publication of Culture for all Londoners in 2018, pending budgetary process and approval at that time.

 

 

 

Stakeholder and Public Engagement

 

  1. The draft Culture for all Londoners and supporting documents, including an executive summary and an EasyRead version and the IIA report, were made available on the London.gov.uk website. There was also a dedicated page on the Talk London webpages.

 

  1. Respondents were able to submit their response to questions through a number of channels, including:

 

  • By completing a webform on London.gov.uk;
  • By completing surveys on TalkLondon; and
  • by email, letter or telephone.

 

  1. The publication of the draft culture section of the strategy was advertised to the public and technical stakeholders through:

 

  • Launch event at Battersea Arts Centre with the Mayor;
  • Press release;
  • A webpage on London.gov.uk;
  • The Talk London webpage;
  • A City Hall blog;
  • Twitter (@MayorofLondon, @LDN_Gov, @LDN_Culture and @LDN_Talk);
  • The Mayor of London Facebook page;
  • A series of workshops and focus groups;
  • Email distribution to over 300 stakeholders and community groups; and
  • Inclusion in Culture Newsletter subscribed to by over 5,000 individuals.

 

  1. The consultation included the following:

 

  • Events: stakeholder consultation activities with circa 175 attendees participating. GLA hosted eight further engagement events with over 80 participants geographically spread across London.
  • Written responses: the draft consultation document was made available and published on the Greater London Authority’s website on 23rd March 2018. Written responses were received from 101 organisations.
  • Public consultation: Two primary mechanisms were used to capture the views of members of the public, broadly categorised as (1) consultation which was primarily via the Talk London Platform which received 1600 unique responses, and (2) research, via quantitative and qualitative opinion research, including eight focus groups on two themes.

 

  1. Appendix B – Report to the Mayor on the Consultation of the draft Culture for all Londoners provides further information on the consultation process and findings.

 

Consultation Response Analysis

 

Over 100 stakeholders responded with 1,623 separate comments or observations that were logged and analysed. The total number of individuals who responded to the public consultation web survey numbered 1,609.  Most consultee responses were positive and supportive of the Mayor’s priorities and plans for culture. Via the Talk London platform, Londoners stated they valued and participated in cultural activity and appeared to regard London’s cultural offer as superior to other cities. The following table sets out the key themes raised through the consultation and how it is recommended that the strategy is amended to address them.

 

Feedback theme

Response and culture section recommended change

Respondents were supportive of the Mayor’s plans linking culture and health and wellbeing. However, several respondents suggested there could be more emphasis on the role of culture in supporting health and well-being as well as social integration.

  • The narrative and programmes around culture, health and wellbeing are strengthened to reflect confirmed activity.
  • New confirmed projects to be included, e.g. Museum of London dementia project.
  • It better articulates the relationship with culture and other team activities like World Health Day.
  • It includes culture’s role in social integration in the context and scope chapter of the culture section.
  • It highlights funds like Culture Seeds, Young Londoners Fund and London Borough of Culture aiming to have an impact on social integration. 

Respondents suggested that there could be a better promotion of all of London’s cultural offer, and access to discounts in the strategy.

 

Talk London participants specifically noted lack of awareness of cultural activities in Outer London.

  • Amplifies that many of the Mayor’s programmes support and promote outer London boroughs, e.g. London Borough of Culture.
  • To add London Area Guides developed in partnership with London & Partners.
  • To add in information about the new cultural tube maps which illustrate cultural institutions across tube lines.
  • To ensure geographic spread and wider range of artistic disciplines/informal activity in the examples we use.
  • Love London section to be updated to highlight how access to cultural participation and engagement will be increased for low income families through a number of programmes.

Respondents were highly supportive of the Mayor’s plans to protect, sustain and save London’s cultural places and spaces. Stakeholder respondents supported the Mayor’s plans to support creative and artist workspaces. Talk London participants specifically indicated that the closure of art centres and libraries were seen as the biggest challenge to culture.  

  • Libraries and archives to be given its own section and the Cultural Infrastructure Plan includes activities that will support libraries.
  • To update the ‘Culture at Risk’ section to reflect venues and facilities that have been protected or sustained since draft culture section launch.

More support to improve access for Deaf and disabled communities to cultural activities.

  • To update the section on ‘East Bank development’ which will include the new UCL Global Disability Innovation hub.
  • To amplify the Mayor’s commitment to achieving Bronze Status at all his festivals and events.
  • To update the Deputy Mayor for Culture and Creative Industries and Deputy Mayor for Education and Childcare’s pledge to the Cultural Inclusion Manifesto aims to promote equal access to cultural and arts opportunities for children and young people with disabilities.
  • To highlight the role of Mayor’s Design Advocates in promoting inclusive design in the public realm.

Respondents broadly supported the Mayor’s plans to increase diversity in the creative workforce, but many suggested more information on the Mayor’s plans to do this could be included, relating to cultural education, apprenticeships and internships.

  • To update the ‘Creative Londoner’ chapter with more detail on existing programmes like Good Work Standard, All Age Careers Guidance, Skills for Londoners etc. 
  • To add the Mayor’s skills programme for creative industries to support diverse talent into the creative workforce.

 

Final intended Strategy text

 

  1. The preparation of the final Culture for all Londoners (Appendix A) document has taken into account the comments received from stakeholders and the public through the consultation. Where appropriate, amendments have been made to ensure consistency between it and the other strategies particularly the sport section of the Culture Strategy. Officers have prepared a Report to the Mayor on the outcome of the consultation, Appendix B. This contains further information about the consultation process, the issues raised by respondents and officers’ recommendations for changes to the final strategy text in response to matters raised in the consultation and other relevant considerations.

 

 Objectives and expected outcomes

 

  1. Culture for all Londoners is to set out the Mayor’s vision for culture in the capital, and how that can be realised. It is a call to action to everyone with a stake in the future of London’s creative industries and cultural offer.

 

  1. Culture for all Londoners has four themed priorities set out above. The outcomes below set out how it is envisaged these priority areas will be achieved.

 

  1. Key London-wide objectives:

 

  • More Londoners participating and engaging with culture; 
  • More diversity across London’s creative workforce;
  • Sustain or grow amount of international and domestic visitors to London;
  • London’s creative economy and employment grows and international investment increases; and
  • London’s night time economy grows and diversifies. 

 

  1. Key expected outcomes of Mayoral Programmes:

 

  • Value of sales, exports and inward investment secured and made by creative businesses participating in GLA-funded activities;
  • Employment opportunities and apprenticeships created through programmes supported by the Mayor’s culture & creative industries funding;
  • Provision of affordable creative workspace and artists’ studios in London meets demand;
  • Funding levered in to cultural projects and programmes through match/ complementary funding; and
  • The number of events delivered as part of core culture programmes, the number of volunteers at these events, and the attendances and reach of these events.

 

  1. Appendix C: Implementation Plan - Culture for all Londoners provides a break-down of these priority areas. The Implementation Plan has been developed articulating at a high level the short to medium term deliverables of the strategy. It sets outcomes, indicators and baselines (where available) to monitor the progress and impact of Culture for all Londoners.

 

Sport section: Sport for all of Us

 

  1. The Mayor wants London to be the most socially integrated and active city in the world. At the heart of this strategy is his belief in the power of sport to bring people together and improve lives. 

 

  • Sport for all of Us (appendix E) has four recommended priority areas:
  • London: socially integrated through sport;
  • London: healthy and active through sport;
  • London: workforce, tech and capacity building; and
  • London: sporting capital of the world.
  • Alongside the Mayor's other strategies and plans, the draft Sport Strategy outlines how community sport, physical activity and major sports events will help achieve the Mayor’s vision for London to be the most socially integrated and active city in the world.  

 

Previous Decisions

 

  1. An earlier MD (MD2129) for the Culture Strategy provided approval for expenditure of £121,000 (referred to above) of which £17,000 was used for a joint Integrated Impact Assessment (IIA) for culture and sport.

 

  1. A previous decision (MD2244) for the Community Sport Investment Programme – ‘Sport Unites’ provided approval for expenditure of £5.8M for a new community sport programme that will be informed by the final strategy.

 

  1. Another MD (MD2327) agreed to the publication of the draft Sport for all of Us, and the associated IIA, for a three-month consultation period. The MD also agreed expenditure of £30,000 from the 2018/19 sport strategy budget for the delivery of consultation activities and research for the final publication of the Sport for all of Us in 2018.

 

Stakeholder and Public Engagement

 

  1. The publication of the draft strategy was advertised to the public and technical stakeholders through:

 

  • TalkLondon:

 

    • Webpage;
    • Surveys;
    • Discussion threads;
    • Emails to TalkLondon members; and
    • @LDN_Talk twitter account.

 

  • Sport team:

 

    • Webpage;
    • Emails – Via London Sport Newsletter; and
    • Letters from the Head of Sport, Simon Cooper, to key stakeholders.

 

  • Mayor of London:

 

    • Press release;
    • Blog;
    • @MayorofLondon and @LDN_Gov twitter accounts; and
    • Facebook.

 

  1. The consultation also included the following:

 

  • Stakeholder engagement through:

 

    • Workshop events: three stakeholder events were independently facilitated by London Sport. Over 50 stakeholders attended these workshops;

 

    • Written responses: the draft consultation document was made available and published on the GLA’s website in July 2018. Written responses were received from over 60 stakeholders. Stakeholders were:

 

      • Individuals responding on behalf of organisations;
      • Individuals responding to the consultation questions with specialist knowledge of the topic; and
      • Individuals responding free-form with specialist knowledge of the topic.

 

  • The Public: The primary mechanisms used to capture the views of members of the public, was via the Talk London Platform. 

 

  1. Appendix F – Report to the Mayor on the consultation of the draft Sport for all of Us provides further information on the consultation process and findings.

 

Consultation Response Analysis

 

  1. The draft strategy was welcomed by the public and stakeholders, and most notably by community and voluntary organisations within the sports sector. Areas that resonated most positively with attendees at the three stakeholder events included the focus on community engagement, social integration/inclusion and strength of ambition.

 

  1. Over 100 stakeholders responded to the consultation. They provided a total of 535 suggestions to the draft strategy. Of the 246 suggestions that indicated support for the strategy – either positive or negative - 229 (93%) were positive.

 

  1. There were a large number of responses in relation to the definition of sport within the strategy.  Some requested that ‘sport’ is replaced by the term ‘physical activity’, as it was felt to be more inclusive, and can encompass a greater variety of activities.

 

  1. The following table sets out the key themes raised through consultation and how it is recommended that the strategy is amended to address them:

 

Feedback theme

Response and sport section recommended change

Community sport: Sport Unites

  • There was overwhelming general support for the three themes of: Sport for Social Integration; Active Londoners; and Workforce, Tech and Capacity Building.

 

  • More detail is required for the ‘Workforce’ theme; and more generally to set out what actions will follow.

 

 

  • The strategy needs to provide more detail about timelines and what actions will follow.

 

  • Given the strength of support, the three themes have not been amended.

 

 

 

  • Additional detail on the Workforce Theme has been added to the final strategy document and a ‘What We Will Do’ summary added to the end of each chapter.

 

  • An Implementation Report Plan will be published alongside the strategy which outlines timelines and beneficiaries.

 

Definition of ‘sport’

  • The definition of ‘sport’, which can be off-putting for some, must be broadened to include ‘physical activity’.

 

 

  • The draft strategy acknowledges this, setting out references to ‘sport’ include ‘sport’ alongside physical activity’. However for clarification purposes, additional text has been added to the final strategy document. The sub-title of the document on the front cover, has also been changed to read: ‘The Mayor’s strategy for sport and physical activity in London.’

Target Groups

  • The strategy should set out which groups of people should be targeted for certain issues, for example: BAME; older people; younger people; disabled people; people on low incomes; and how the Mayor will work with schools.

 

 

 

  • We consider that the right approach in our work is to target the issue (for example, a focus on inactive people for tackling inactivity). Although we will ensure that overall funding from the programme benefits all demographic groups, due to the correlation between inactivity and certain groups these groups will be particularly targeted.

 

  • The final strategy document has clarified the issues-based approach.

 

  • The issues-based approach and demographic identification will also form part of the evaluation criteria for grant awards.

 

  • Our work with the Laureus Foundation is based on the principle of local people determining what issues to address and, accordingly, which people to target.

 

  • The draft strategy set out how we intend to work with children of school age. However, further text on school sport and PE has been added to the final version of the strategy document. 

Barriers to participation

  • Account must be taken of the barriers to participation, particularly cost in respect of people on a low income, and air quality.

 

 

  • The draft strategy stated the intention to fund affordable opportunities, but the final version strengthens the wording on this. New text has been added on the Mayor’s work to improve air quality to the final version of the strategy.

 

 

 

Facilities

  • Londoners must have access to facilities and areas in which they can be physically active. Playing fields must be protected.

 

 

 

 

  • Funding should be made available for capital spend from the Sport Unites programme.

 

 

 

 

 

  • The strategy references the draft new London Plan, which sets out the Mayor’s proposed planning policy to protect playing fields and to protect and enhance existing facilities, with no overall net loss of facilities in London.

 

 

  • Capital spend can be expensive, even for relatively modest contributions to a facility build or refurbishment. We believe that, for the investment we have available, people-focussed revenue funding is the best way to maximise the impact of our funding where often small amounts of money can make a huge difference. Additional text has been added on this to the final version of the strategy.

Funding and delivery

  • Funding should be given to proven, successful existing initiatives, rather than seeking to ‘reinvent the wheel’.

 

 

 

  • The draft strategy set out our intention to invest in tried and tested projects, but it also stated that we want to try new and innovative ways of delivery. The use of ‘pilot’ schemes can be an effective way of doing this. This approach has been strengthened through additional text in the final version of the strategy.

 

Links to other Mayoral strategies

  • There should be clear links to other Mayoral strategies and priorities to maximise the impact of the Mayor’s work in sport and physical activity.

 

 

 

  • The draft strategy had a section on links to other Mayoral strategies and policies, including health inequalities; transport; environment; equality, diversity and inclusion; the London Plan; housing; culture; skills; and the night time economy. However, the final strategy has been strengthened this an additional section outlining links with other strategies.

 

Partnership working

  • The Mayor should seek to partner with a wide range of organisations and facilitate partnerships between organisations, including cross-sector working.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Role models can play an important part in delivery.

 

 

 

  • The strategy acknowledges the importance of the existing key partnerships we have with UK Sport, Sport England, London Sport, sport national governing bodies and others. It also states that we will support ways to forge new partnerships and host conferences to provide thought leadership, and other events that bring together different organisations to share best practice.

 

  • The draft strategy, including the Mayor’s foreword, acknowledged the inspirational and powerful effect of role models. Additional text on this has been added to the final version of the strategy.

Major sports events

  • There was strong support to continue to attract and support major sports events in London - and to ensure that economic and social benefits are secured from hosting.

 

  • Opinion was more mixed about which events to support.

 

 

  • We will be undertaking a review of our Major Events Framework, which will look at our existing funding criteria and take a strategic look at which events we may want to target in the coming years.

 

  • We expect to strengthen our existing condition that major events must secure economic, social and community benefits in return for our support. Additional text on this has been added to the final version of the strategy.

Measurement, monitoring and evaluation

  • There will need to be clear measurement and KPIs in order to demonstrate success of the aims of the strategy. Long-term change should be the primary measure of success.

 

  • The definition of ‘social integration’ needs to be clear.

 

 

 

  • Do not make monitoring too burdensome.

 

 

 

  • The strategy acknowledges the need for clear measures and robust monitoring - and acknowledges that long-term outcomes are desirable.

 

  • The GLA has identified a generic set of measures that it will use to track social integration that will inform those used for Sport Unites.

 

  • We will endeavour to keep the right balance between the need to demonstrate accountability and impact of public money, while at the same time keeping bureaucracy to a minimum.

Consultation

  • One of the workshop findings was that the development of the strategy was too ‘top down’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Some considered the length of the strategy document and format to be off-putting, which may restrict readership and engagement. It was suggested that the document be presented in different forms of media. 

 

  • Over 170 organisations took part in a series of events in the formulation of the Sport Unites programme, including sport national governing bodies; community sport organisations; non-sport community organisations; local authorities and others. This issue was not raised in responses in any other part of the consultation process with stakeholders or the wider public.

 

  • We hope that the widespread consultation support we received demonstrates the care we took to get this right. There is always a balance to strike between offering enough detail while avoiding unnecessarily lengthy narrative. We feel the balance in the strategy document is right. We have also produced an ‘Easy Read’ version of the document.

Final intended Strategy text

 

​​​​​​​The preparation of the final Sport for all of Us document has taken into account the comments received from stakeholders and the public through the consultation. Where appropriate amendments have been made to ensure consistency between it and the other strategies, particularly the culture section of the Culture Strategy. Officers have prepared a Report to the Mayor on the outcome of the consultation, appendix F. This contains further information about the consultation process, the issues raised by respondents and officers’ recommendations for changes to the final strategy text in response to matters raised in the consultation and other relevant considerations.

 

Objectives and expected outcomes

 

Sport for all of Us is to set out the Mayor’s vision for sport in the capital, and how that can be realised. At the heart of the strategy’s approach is the belief in the power of sport to bring people together and to improve their lives.

The key objectives below set out how it is envisaged that this vision will be achieved:

 

  • A more socially integrated London;
  • To improve the physical and mental health of Londoners;
  • To develop the community sports workforce and capacity building;
  • Support education, sport and cultural activities which focus on disadvantaged and vulnerable young people aged 10-21; and
  • To enhance London’s profile as the sporting capital of the world and to maximise the economic and social benefits of hosting major sports events.
    1. Appendix G: Implementation Plan - Sport for all of Us provides a break-down of these objectives.

 

 

 

Integrated Impact Assessment (Culture and Sport)

 

  1. The requirement to produce an IIA derives from various pieces of legislation which either imposes a duty on the Mayor in respect of a specific subject area, for example, crime, or creates an obligation to undertake a specific type of assessment of a plan or programme.

 

  1. The IIA of the Culture Strategy (encompassing one culture and one sport strategy) is comprised of an Equality Impact Assessment (EqIA), Health Impact Assessment (HIA) and Community Safety Impact Assessment (CSIA) and due regard for sustainable development in the capital.

 

  1. The IIA must also review the Strategy against the GLA’s overarching IIA Framework Objectives, which are broader.

 

  1. The IIAs have been undertaken to review culture and sport policy options and assess the impact of proposed policies. The IIAs combine these assessments and enable all of the Mayoral strategies to work from the same baseline information.

 

  1. Following consultation, updates and amendments to Culture for all Londoners and Sport for all of Us, the individual IIAs were also reviewed, assessed and updated into the final IIA reports which will be published alongside the final strategies. These are appendices D and H respectively.

 

  1. The lIAs assess the likely equalities impact of Culture for all Londoners and Sport for all of Us, which have been reviewed as appropriate in the light of the responses to the consultation before the final intended strategy is submitted for approval.

 

Equality comments

In preparing and publishing his strategies the Mayor must comply with the public sector equality duty under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010, which requires the Mayor to have ‘due regard’ to the need to (i) eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation; (ii) advance equality of opportunity between people who share a relevant protected characteristic and those who do not; and (iii) foster good relations between people who share a relevant protected characteristic and those who do not.

Protected characteristics under section 149 of the Equality Act are age, disability, gender re-assignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, and marriage or civil partnership status (all except the last being ‘relevant’ protected characteristics). The duty may involve, in particular, removing or minimising any disadvantage suffered by those who have a relevant protected characteristic, taking steps to meet the needs of such people, and encouraging them to participate in public life or in any other activity where their participation is disproportionately low, including tackling prejudice and promoting understanding. Compliance with the Act may involve treating people with a protected characteristic more favourably than those without the characteristic.

An Equality Impact Assessment in respect of both sections of the Culture Strategy are included in their respective IIAs.

Other considerations

Links to other Mayoral strategies are set out above.

A key risk identified prior to consultation was that Culture for all Londoners would not address the needs of the cultural and creative industries in London, or the needs of Londoners in accessing and creating culture. As set out above, the preparation of the final Culture for all Londoners (Appendix A) document has taken into account the comments received from stakeholders and the public through the consultation.

A key risk is that Sport for all of Us does not achieve the social integration objectives contained within it and is not able to support access of Londoners to sporting opportunities, both as participants and spectators. This will be mitigated through our investment of initiatives that outcomes align with social integration objectives and regular monitoring and evaluation reports from grant recipients at milestones.

The Culture Strategy is a new and ambitious programme of work with challenging targets. This will be mitigated by appropriate research, evaluation and skilled staff and partners to deliver outcomes outlined within the implementation plans. In addition we will liaise with key stakeholders to create a leadership event to discuss learning and establish best practice.

Further, non-substantive changes to the design and appearance of either strategies (Culture for all Londoners and Sport for all of Us) will be made between this form being signed and the document being published. Such changes will be approved by the Deputy Mayor for Social Integration, Social Mobility and Community Engagement (Sport for all of Us) and the Deputy Mayor for Culture and Creative Industries (Culture for all Londoners).

In addition, the Mayor in preparing or revising this strategy must have regard to:

(a) The principal purposes of the Authority (promoting economic development and wealth creation, social development and improvement of the environment in Greater London);

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• Major Sports Events (Introduction);
• Context (Sport in London: now and in the future);
• Context (London: sports capital of the world);
• How to maximise the benefits of hosting major sports events (London: sports capital of the world);
• What we will do (London: sports capital of the world); and
• Aligning with Mayoral strategies and polices.

Culture

• Addressed across all priority chapters: Love London, Culture and Good Growth, Creative Londoner and World City.

(b) The effect which the proposed strategy or revision would have on:

(i) The health of persons in Greater London;

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• Sport Unites (Introduction); and
• Theme two: Active Londoners (Sport Unites).

Culture

• Addressed in chapters Love London and Culture and Good Growth.

(ii) Health inequalities between persons living in Greater London;

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• Theme two: Active Londoners (Sport Unites); and
• The Mayor’s Civic Innovation Challenge (Theme three: Workforce, Tech & Capacity Building).

Culture

• Addressed in chapter: Love London and Creative Londoners.

(iii) The achievement of sustainable development in the United Kingdom;

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• Sustainability (London: sports capital of the world);
• Sporting Partnerships (Sport in London: now and in the future);
• What we will Do (Theme two: Active Londoners); and
• How to maximise the benefits of hosting major sports events (London: sports capital of the world).

Culture

• Address in chapter: Culture and Good Growth and World City.

(iv) Climate change, and the consequences of climate change.

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• What we will do (Theme two: Active Londoners);
• How to maximise the benefits of hosting major sports events (London: sports capital of the world); and
• What we will do (Theme two: Active Londoners).

Culture

• Addressed in chapter: Culture and Good Growth.

The Mayor must also have regard to:

(a) The need to ensure that the strategy is consistent with national policies, with the EU obligations of the United Kingdom and with such other international obligations of the United Kingdom as the Secretary of State may notify to the Mayor for the purposes of this paragraph;

The Secretary of State has not notified the Mayor of any such polices.

(b) The need to ensure that the strategy is consistent with other Mayoral strategies;

Sport

Addressed in: sub-heading (chapter):

• The Mayor’s commitment to Sport in London (Sport in London: now and in the future).

Culture

Set out in chapter; Context and Scope of the Strategy.

(c) The resources available for implementation of the strategy; and

• Addressed through GLA budgetary process.

(d) The desirability of promoting and encouraging the use of the River Thames safely, in particular for the provision of passenger transport services and for the transportation of freight”.

Sport

• The Sport Team will attend meetings of the Thames & London Waterways. A priority for this group is to explore how more can be done to grow sport and recreation on the waterways for all Londoners.

Culture

• Addressed in chapter: Culture and Good Growth.

Financial comments

There are no direct financial implications arising from the publication of the Culture Strategy.

Activity table

Activity

Timeline

Copy sent to GLA Secretariat

4 December 2018

Copy provided to the Chair of the London Assembly to formally lay the final strategy in front of the Assembly for consideration

5-6 December 2018

Assembly to publish papers (including the final strategy) for their plenary on the strategy

December 2018

London Assembly plenary to consider the final strategy

13 December 2018

Final Culture Strategy formally published

January 2019