Integrated Victims’ Services

Reference code: 
DMPCD 2016 44
Date signed: 
17 March 2016
Authorisation name: 
Stephen Greenhalgh (past staff), Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime

Executive summary

MOPAC assumed responsibility for commissioning victims’ services in London in October 2014. Commissioning focused on moving from a national to a regional commissioning model whilst maintaining and improving services to victims in the first year (DMPCD 2014 110) and on developing specialised services and the referral pathways into them in the second year (DMPCD 2015 46). This decision confirms MOPAC’s strategic commissioning plans for 2016-17 and seeks approval to commit expenditure against the Ministry of Justice Victims Grant for 2016/17. This includes work to improve and develop support services for victims as they progress through the CJS, whilst ensuring that both universal and specialised services remain of a high quality.   

Recommendation

Service Provision

The DMPC is asked to:

  • approve £5,895,000 of funding for the referral mechanism and associated services as described in section 3;
  • approve £1,163,000 for the delivery of specialised services as described in section 4;
  • approve £1,524,360 of funding for the delivery of services to assist victims of Child Sexual Abuse as described in section 5;
  • approve £30,000 of funding for the delivery of VCSE service provision and capacity building as described in section 6;
  • approve £550,000 of funding for Restorative Justice services as described in section 7.

 

Change Programme

The DMPC is asked to:

  • approve £705,000 of funding for Victim Service Pathfinder as described in section 8;
  • approve £125,000 of funding for the delivery of the updated Independent Review of Victim Services in London as described in section 9.
  • Approve £133,320 of funding to support an enhancement of commissioning and implementation capacity as described in section 10.

 

General

The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in sections 3 to 10, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

Non-confidential facts and advice to the Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime (DMPC)

 

  1. Introduction and background
  2. MOPAC assumed responsibility for commissioning victims’ services in London from 1st October 2014 and funding has transferred from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) for this purpose.
  3. This decision paper sets out MOPAC’s commissioning approach for 2016-17 and beyond and seeks approval to commit MoJ funding in line with that approach.

 

  1. It should be noted that MOPAC’s overall spend on victims’ services is in excess of the annual funding provided by the MoJ. MOPAC allocates significant additional resources to provide specialised services with regard to sexual violence and domestic abuse (DMPCD 2014 143; DMPCD 2015 24 and DMPCD 2015 107 refer).

 

  1. MoJ funding to MOPAC for 2016-17 totals £10,092,360. MOPAC will commit other monies to supporting victims of crime in London but this decision will only cover the MoJ amount.

 

 

  1. MOPAC’s Approach to Victims’ Commissioning

 

  1. MOPAC’s strategic ambition is to drive a 'whole system' approach to:
    • support victims of crime to cope and recover;
    • protect vulnerable victims;
    • reduce repeat victimisation; and
    • drive victim satisfaction and confidence in the criminal justice system (CJS).

 

  1. MOPAC is working with victims, statutory agencies and key support service providers to develop a co-ordinated, cohesive approach to supporting victims in London – Integrated Victims’ Services (IVS).

 

  1. The London Crime Reduction Board (LCRB), which includes criminal justice agencies and local authorities, has adopted the improvement of the victim experience as a fourth priority area and partners in London are supportive of this drive to improve the service to victims and witnesses.
     
  2. The national Victims’ Services Commissioning Framework sets out the key principles upon which MOPAC’s victim commissioning strategy is based. The key outcome for the commissioning of victims’ services is to support victims to cope and recover as measured through eight categories of need identified within the Framework[1].

 

  1. The Framework sets out the requirement for agencies in the CJS and services commissioned by MOPAC to be compliant with the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime[2] and the EU Directive on Victims of Crime[3]. A key factor for compliance with the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime is the recognition of priority categories of victims to ensure that services are targeted at those who have suffered the greatest impact as follows:
  • Victims of more serious crimes;
  • Vulnerable or intimidated victims; and
  • Repeat or persistently targeted victims.

 

  1. In addition, the Framework identifies a clear role for PCCs in ensuring the victim’s pathway through the CJS runs smoothly and partners work effectively to meet the personalised needs of victims with complex needs. 

 

  1. The Independent Review of Victims’ Services in London, commissioned in 2014 and overseen by the Victims’ Commissioner, Baroness Newlove, remains important in ensuring the MOPAC victims’ strategy is appropriately targeted. The Review made thirteen recommendations, which have informed MOPAC’s approach (see Appendix 1). 

 

  1. MOPAC has adopted a phased approach to change to enable the development of more effective models of support whilst maintaining a quality service and managing risk. The result is a more robust, London appropriate model on which to further build our vision of IVS. 

 

MOPAC Victims’ Commissioning from October 2014

 

  1. In the two years since the devolution of funding for victims’ services commissioning to PCCs, the focus has been on:
    • maintaining universal provision at existing levels of quality;
    • developing specialised services so that there is a consistent offer across London;
    • introducing new services to support high risk victims (for example the Pan London Domestic Violence Service);
    • strengthening partnerships with both commissioners and providers; and
    • reviewing the effectiveness of service provision in London.

 

  1. Phase 1, in 2014-15, focused on moving from a national to a regional commissioning model whilst maintaining and improving services to victims. Within Phase 1 (DMPC decision 2014 110 refers), MOPAC:
    • commissioned an Independent Review of Victim Services in London, led by the Victims’ Commissioner, Baroness Newlove;
    • commissioned a London-wide referral mechanism and associated services, with the addition of enhanced provision for repeat, vulnerable and young victims; and
    • commissioned a number of specialist services to address specific and immediate gaps in provision as set out in the Independent Review.

 

  1. Phase 1 also included agreement to commission work to re-design support services for victims of crime as they progress through the CJS, thus helping to increase engagement with the CJS and help to ensure swift and sure justice.  

 

  1. Phase 2, in 2015-16, focused on developing specialised services and the referral pathways into them. Within Phase 2 (DMPC decision 2015 46 refers) MOPAC:
    • ensured continued support for VCSE service provision and capacity building;
    • provided specialist support aligned to MOPAC’s wider strategic objectives of reducing repeat victimisation and helping victims cope and recover;
    • aligned provision to the recommendations of the Independent Review, and to the broad range of MOPAC victim-focussed strategies, including the Hate Crime and Violence Against Women and Girls strategies. 

 

  1. Phase 2 also built on the re-design work (paragraph 2.11.) by designing a new model for supporting victims of crime through the CJS in London in partnership with statutory agencies, VCSE service providers and victims of crime. This is based on agreed design principles and paves the way for a ‘Pathfinder’ model to operationally test the new service (see section 8 for more details).

 

MOPAC Victims’ Commissioning: Phase 3 – 2016-17

 

  1. To date there has been considerable investment and progress in securing and developing existing services, including a range of new specialised services, and a major programme of work to improve support for victims across the CJS has been put in place.

    The key aims for Phase 3 are to:

    • maintain consistent quality service provision in both universal and specialised services; and
    • operationally test new ways of working to support victims in the CJS, as developed in 2015-16 (paragraph 2.13.).

 

  1. This decision covers MOPAC’s intentions for expenditure for supporting victims of crime in 2016-17. It also covers future years from a strategic perspective where possible.

 

  1. The changing context over the next four years will impact on support services for victims of crime. In 2016-17:
    • Both general and specialised services for victims will need to be maintained at a high quality level during the period of Mayoral transition in 2016;
    • MOPAC, together with CJS partners, has developed an ambitious plan for the Victim Service Pathfinder programme. This is a new model for providing support for victims through the CJS in London and it is intended to move this forward via a Pathfinder project (see section 8);
    • A number of key pieces of work will be completed or are ongoing that will inform future commissioning – for example, the MOPAC and NHS Sexual Violence and CSE Needs Assessment for London; and the Harmful Practices Pilot;
    • The MPS and London Local Authorities are jointly developing a focus on vulnerability which will also need to be aligned to MOPAC’s work with victims; and
    • Research and development conducted through specialised frontline VCSE providers of victim services will give rise to demand for different types of support and new commissioning methods.

 

  1. In 2017-18 MOPAC will have a broader evidence base upon which to continue to develop the commissioning approach to both universal and specialised services.  This will include a range of outcome data from existing commissioned services, as well as from the Pathfinder. This will be supported by the sexual violence needs assessment and Child Sexual Exploitation work already funded by MOPAC core budgets, and by a refreshed independent review of victims services in London. In addition, the strength of our partner and service provider relationships will also provide an effective platform from which to develop a co-commissioning approach.

 

  1. The context for 2017-18 and beyond will provide the following further opportunities and challenges:
    • Potential for further devolution of the CJS to Police and Crime Commissioners of services for victims and witnesses currently commissioned on a national basis by the Ministry of Justice, or at least an opportunity to influence any national recommissioning process to ensure it meets the needs of London’s victims; and
    • Government will consult on and introduce a Victims’ Law at some point during this term. It is likely to make statutory PCC responsibilities for providing support to crime victims, as well as enshrine victims’ rights, current covered by the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime, in law.

 

  1. Beyond 2018, it will be important to continue to develop victims’ services as the profile of victimisation shifts and changes and in response to new, emerging priorities in policing and crime.

 

 

Service Provision

 

  1. The Referral Mechanism

 

  1. The referral mechanism (and associated services), which is being provided by Victim Support, provides the main pathway into support for victims of crime in London.  MOPAC is required to ensure that such a mechanism exists to provide universal access to support for those who choose to report crime and for those who do not, and there is a need to ensure that the quality and consistency of existing provision is maintained during this period of change. Therefore it is proposed that the services of Victim Support are retained to secure the provision of this service.

 

  1. Victim Support’s MOPAC-commissioned service has delivered well since October 2014.  MOPAC has made several improvements to the service and has derived greater value from the grant over this period:
    • Almost 400,000 victims have been helped to cope and recover;
    • A dedicated Children & Young People’s Unit has been established and has helped over 1,500 victims with a range of complex needs;
    • A dedicated Repeat Victims’ Unit has been established and has helped almost 5,000 victims;
    • A ground-breaking service for international visitors who fall victim to crime when in London has been launched and has helped over 500 victims with ‘transactional’ support;
    • Changes to the way victims are contacted in line with the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime have been implemented, resulting in cost savings of 5 per cent; and
    • Victim satisfaction levels with the service delivered by Victim Support have remained consistently over 90 per cent.

 

  1. Based on the need to maintain existing service provision and the increasing quality and value being derived from this agreement, it is proposed that MOPAC enacts its contractual clause to further extend the Victim Support grant agreement for a 2 year period with relevant break clauses (with effect from 1 April 2016) up to the value of £5.895m in each year, subject to the outcomes of the Pathfinder work and the 2017-18 MoJ victims’ funding allocation.  This extension will achieve a further 5% saving on the previous cost of a like for like offer.  It should be noted that due to the timeframes attached to MoJ notification on funding the Victim Support agreement has previously been extended for a 6 month period (October 2015-March 2016); allowing consistency of service delivery whilst awaiting funding information for 2016/17 (DMPCD 2015 46 refers and approves budget).

 

  1. It is proposed that the new arrangement with Victim Support will include clauses with sufficient flexibility to allow for the phased changes represented by the Victim Service Pathfinder work, which Victim Support are fully supportive of. This will involve costs around staffing, training and relocation and will require a degree of flexibility with the new grant agreement. 

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, and the sustainability of currently commissioned services that are delivering against key outcomes, the DMPC is asked to approve £5,895,000 of funding for the renewal of the Victim Support grant. 

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 3, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

  1. Specialised Services

 

  1. MOPAC’s approach is to enable the provision of targeted and specialised services in line with the needs identified in the Independent Review and with key MOPAC strategies. MOPAC allocates significant additional resources to provide specialised services, outside of the MoJ victims’ grant, in recognition of the disproportionate scale of specialised need in London compared to other areas of England and Wales. These services have been developed in partnership with statutory agencies, providers and services users and form the bedrock of support behind the universal offer provided by Victim Support. It is proposed that funding is allocated to the following areas of specialist provision.

 

            Young Victims of Crime

 

  1. The Independent Review of Victims’ Services identified gaps in provision for young people as victims. In response to this, MOPAC’s approach has been to address this in terms of young people affected and victimised through knife crime and other serious youth violence, sexual violence and gang association. 

 

  1. Through the work on the Gangs Strategic Ambitions, we know that 61% of gang members have also been a victim of crime.  There continues to be significant risk in relation to the exploitation of young women in or at risk of gang involvement and associated sexual violence. To address this, it is proposed that further funding is provided to continue Safer London’s Empower programme, which delivers intensive support and education programmes for young people affected by sexual exploitation. 
     
  2. It is also proposed that provision is made within the victims commissioning budget to ensure the continuation and expansion of MOPAC’s work with the Major Trauma Centres (MTCs) in London; specifically related to the continuation of the Solace Women’s Aid Independent Domestic Violence Advocates who support young victims of domestic abuse, who come to the attention of services through attendance at the MTCs.  

 

  1. MOPAC commissioned Middlesex University to undertake specialist research to inform the commissioning process. This found that half of young people managed by Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) within the LRC areas had been the victim of or witnessed crime, abuse and/or violence and had emotional/mental health needs linked to these experiences. However, the primary focus of interventions in the youth justice system has traditionally been criminogenic need.
     
  2. In response to this, MOPAC previously secured £400,000 through the MOJ competed fund, which was granted to the London Resettlement Consortia (LRC) as a vehicle to commission interventions for young victims involved in the youth justice system.

 

  1. The LRCs provide enhanced resettlement support to young offenders serving custodial sentences, although the victim interventions projects are not exclusively for those exiting custody. The two LRC areas are:
  • North East London - Waltham Forest (lead borough), Enfield, Newham, Hackney, Redbridge and Islington.
  • South East London – Lewisham (lead borough), Lambeth, Southwark, Croydon, Greenwich and Wandsworth.

 

  1. The LRC has commissioned victim interventions to address the emotional and mental health needs of young people who have offended, but who do not meet the CAMHS threshold.  Two different approaches are being used. The North London LRC has commissioned a clinically led outreach service and the South London LRC an enhanced case worker model. Both approaches are being evaluated by MOPAC. 

 

  1. This funding has enabled MOPAC to reach ‘hard to engage’ young victims who do not access traditional victim support services. It is therefore proposed that funding for victims interventions for young people who have offended and experienced prior victimisation is continued in 2016-17. The key features and broad objectives for the funding will be the provision of services to help ‘hard to reach’ young victims cope and recover from the effects of crime and the continuation of the LRC victims interventions (dependant on interim evaluation findings).

 

  1. MOPAC will work with colleagues in the Health sector to attract match-funding for this programme of work.

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is proposed that the DMPC approve £460,000 of funding to ensure the future sustainability of victim interventions for young offenders who have prior victimisation.

 

  1. The DMPC is also asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and contractual/grant arrangements and grant extensions related to the work described in this section, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

Hate Crime

 

  1. MOPAC’s Hate Crime Strategy sets out a more focused and robust response from those partners in the criminal justice system with the responsibility to act when hate crime occurs. It is also leading the drive for a more joined up approach to how victims are supported to cope and recover from what has happened to them, and ensuring they receive swift and sure justice.

 

  1. Through our understanding of the current hate crime context in London and by building on the consultation responses, MOPAC has identified three clear objectives for the strategy that will have a positive impact on the incidence of hate crime in London and the experience of those who fall victim to it:
    • Objective 1: Boost confidence and increase the reporting of hate crime
    • Objective 2: Prevent hate crime and reduce repeat victimisation
    • Objective 3: Ensure swift and sure justice for hate crime victims

 

  1. It is proposed that provision is made within the victims’ budget to support the continued delivery of the hate crime strategy and to secure the continuation of two existing projects, which together provide specialist pan-London support for victims of LGBT and anti-Semitic hate crime for twelve months from 1st April 2016 to 31st March 2017.

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is proposed that the DMPC approve £258,000 of funding to support victims of hate crime.

 

  1. The DMPC is also asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and contractual/grant arrangements and grant extensions related to the work described in this section, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

City of London Victims’ Programmes

 

  1. The victims funding from the Ministry of Justice is intended to support the provision of services for the policing areas covered by MOPAC and the City of London Corporation (i.e. Metropolitan Police Service and City of London Police areas). The City of London Corporation has agreed that MOPAC should lead the commissioning on behalf of the whole of London, with the exception of the Economic Crime Victim Care Unit (ECVCU), which sits with the City of London Police within their remit for leading Action Fraud. The City of London Corporation also uses funding for a Vulnerable Victims Advocate for their resident victims.

 

  1. In 2014/15, as part of the MOPAC bid to the MoJ Competed Fund, City of London Police, in association with the MPS and British Transport Police, developed the first dedicated Economic Victim Care Unit (ECVCU) in the country.

 

  1. While conventional crimes such as theft, burglary and violence are reducing, there has been a rise in fraud and economic crime. In addition, the internet, with all the advantages for criminals of global reach, speed, new technological developments and capability for sheer scale, has provided a powerful catalyst for change as crime moves from physical to online. This has led to a rise in, and new forms of, economic cybercrime, which involves technology and/or the internet in some way.

 

  1. The ECVCU is a small specialised team that addresses a particular gap in provision of service to victims of economic crime, particularly fraud, and it specifically deals with those who report a crime through Action Fraud (AF). The two key outcomes for victims are to improve feelings of safety for victims and to reduce opportunities for repeat victimisation. This is leading edge work, which responds to the growing threat and impact of economic crime, which particularly targets vulnerable people, and which directly supports the MOPAC Business Crime Strategy.

 

  1. The development of ECVCU this year will include consideration of the future sustainability of the service, particularly as Action Fraud continues to develop its capacity to more effectively identify and refer victims of economic crime to relevant local services, as well as any opportunities to avoid duplication and deliver efficiencies across all provision within London (MOPAC and City of London Corporation area).

 

  1. The Vulnerable Victims’ Advocate (VVA) provides a service to vulnerable victims of crime in the City of London police area, in particular those who have experienced domestic and sexual abuse and hate crime.  This role recognises the unique and distinct context of the City of London, providing preventative services within the financial services industry and targeted support for victims.

 

  1. The VVA worker links in to the MOPAC-commissioned pan-London Domestic Violence Service to ensure accurate referrals are made.

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is proposed that the DMPC approve £250,000 of funding to be transferred to City of London Corporation for these programmes of work. 

 

  1. The DMPC is also asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and contractual/grant arrangements and grant extensions related to the work described in this section, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence

 

  1. The Mayor’s Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy identifies areas of work that provide direct support to victims.  There are a number of ongoing programmes of work to support such victims, including The Harmful Practices Pilot (DMPC decision 2014 74 refers).  The pilot is in the second year of a two-year delivery programme and it is improving the way that agencies identify and respond to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, ‘honour’-based violence and faith based abuse.  This is being achieved through the delivery of three main areas of work: multi-agency and specialist training for professionals – e.g. police, social workers, teachers, an Educator Advocate service/surgery, and community engagement activity. To date practitioners have provided advice in 71 cases, 21 training events between August and December 2015, including 18 half day multi-agency sessions and three two-day specialist sessions.  The pilot is progressing well and it is proposed that £120,000 is made available through the victims’ grant in order to proceed with year two of the pilot.
     
  2. In addition to the above, it is proposed that a new programme of work is added to the MOPAC portfolio to support female victims of trafficking.  The POPPY Project provides tailored, victim-centred support to aid the recovery and reintegration of trafficked women through the development of individual support plans that address the key outcome areas for cope and recovery, such as housing, health and employment.

 

  1. The POPPY Project works with women in the community as well as those who are in custody.  Through their work, the Poppy project has identified that Prison and Detention officers are often not sufficiently trained or adequately prepared to identify, refer or assist victims of trafficking. It is proposed to provide £75,000 to the POPPY Project to support its work with women in custody, which includes the provision of clinics and workshops to female detainees in order to encourage their disclosure and awareness of their rights, as well as training for prison staff. This successful and proven approach leads to further referrals within the sector and increased identification of victims.

 

  1. On the basis of the above information, it is proposed that the DMPC approve £195,000 of funding to support victims of domestic and sexual violence.

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 4, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

  1. Child Sexual Abuse (CSA)

 

  1. It is recognised that there is increasing demand in the area of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA).  “Protecting children from harm” by the Children’s Commissioner for England estimated that 450,000 children in England and Wales are sexually abused each year, and of these only 1 in 8 are reported to public authorities.  An NSPCC study in 2010, estimated 9.4% of children 11-17 years old experience sexual abuse and 1.9% experience contact sexual abuse. For London this 9.4% equates to 12,500 children per year and we know that less than 4000 reported the offences and less than 1000 accessed health support in 2014. 
     
  2. There is also a broader public policy agenda to increase the early identification of victims of CSA to enable a reduction in long-term harm.  Sexual violence and abuse can cause severe and long lasting harm to victims, including physical injury, sexually transmitted infections, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, substance abuse, self-harm, domestic violence and in some cases, sexually-offending behaviour in some young males.

 

  1. MOPAC is working in partnership with the London Safeguarding Children’s Board to address wider issues of child sexual exploitation (CSE) across the capital, including the early identification and prevention of victimisation.  This activity will be informed by the jointly commissioned MOPAC and NHSE Sexual Violence and CSE Needs Assessment for London.

 

  1. There is also growing consensus that the co-ordinated, multi-agency Child House model is the right approach for minimising the trauma of victims and improving the evidence available for the police and criminal justice agencies to prosecute offenders.

 

  1. MOPAC/NHSE (London) commissioned the “Review of Child Sexual Assault Pathway for London” which mapped the various London pathways for children and young people following child sexual abuse. The findings included variation in services available across all London boroughs and gaps in medical, emotional support and the prosecution process. The recommendations included the establishment of five Child Houses in London by 2020 and an enhanced paediatric service at the Havens.

 

  1. The Child House model aims to make the investigative and judicial process faster, less traumatic and result in fewer failed cases. Currently failure is due to a number of factors; an insufficiency of evidence, and retracted testimonies are but two reasons. Retraction occurs because of lengthy delay or pressure from family/friends. Victims will be interviewed in the Child House with a clinical psychologist using creativity and appropriate questioning to elicit a compelling evidential story from the child.  The Child House will provide medical examination and documentation of injuries, as well as providing long-term emotional and mental health interventions to build resilience and recovery for the child and family. 

 

  1. It is proposed that MOPAC make a financial contribution to the NHS-led and funded work to develop two of the Child Houses proposed in the “Review of Child Sexual Assault Pathway for London”, each providing examinations, investigative interviews, aftercare and emotional support to the current 200 children and young people seen every year. It is anticipated that this number will quadruple as public awareness is raised and agencies work in partnership.

 

  1. Scoping, design and development will take place in 2016-17:
    • Identification of Child House location – this could include re-use of an existing health or third sector premises
    • Creation of shared vision for the Child House through workshops, surveys and focus groups
    • Development of implementation plan and partnership agreement (underwritten by the key partners and overseen by the Pan-London CSA Steering Group)
    • Engagement with central Government to overcome barriers and challenges to testing ABE and section 28 pre-court cross examinations in the child house
    • Preparation for go live (e.g. premises, equipment and recruitment).

 
 

  1. In 2015-16, the Norfolk Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner distributed approximately £5 million of national funding to support victims of sexual abuse (on behalf of the MoJ).  As a result, nine voluntary and community sector organisations were funded to deliver services to victims of sexual abuse in London; the funding was for one year only to 31 March 2016.  Given the increasing demand in this area, it is proposed that this funding is continued for these services for 2016/17 on the conditions that consistent performance is delivered.  MOPAC has commissioned as CSE pan London needs assessment with NHS London which will report in September 2016; all future commissioning decisions in relation to CSE will be derived from this report.

 

  1. On the basis of the above information, it is proposed that the DMPC approve £1,524,360 of funding for support services for victims of Child Sexual Abuse; £1m for the Child House, £408,000 for the continuation of the VCSE services currently funded by the 2015/16 Norfolk sexual abuse fund, and a further £116,360 allocated to support the outcomes of the Sexual Violence and CSE Needs Assessment (September 2016).

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 5, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. VCSE Service Provision and Capacity Building (Small Grants Fund)

 

  1.             The Independent Review of Victims’ Services identified that a large proportion of services for victims of crime are delivered by small VCSE organisations. This allows for diversification within the market and for local services to be more closely tailored to local demand to help victims cope and recover. The Review made a specific recommendation that MOPAC should develop a capacity building approach to support the engagement of VCS organisations in the commissioning of victims’ services.

 

  1. As a result, for the last two financial years, MOPAC has commissioned the London Community Foundation to administer a Small Grants Fund. This fund has provided over £1m to more than 30 VCSE organisations in London, operating in wide range of specialisms.

    It has:

    • enabled MOPAC’s funding to reach victims of crime that would not otherwise have received support to help them cope and recover;
    • provided quality specialised support to a hugely diverse range of victims, both in terms of crime type and demography;
    • integrated smaller VCSE service providers with the universal offer to improve pathways into specialised support.

 

  1. It is therefore proposed that the small grants fund is continued in 2016-17 and administered by the London Community Foundation. The key features and broad objectives remain consistent with those of 2014/15, as set out below:
  • VCSE provision of services to help victims cope and recover from the effects of crime;
  • targeting, but not limited to, organisations working with those sectors in which MOPAC analysis has identified gaps in provision and which support the delivery of key MOPAC strategies; and
  • proportionate outcomes measurement.
     

    1. The fund will be launched in late 2016-17 and grant funding to VCSE organisations allocated from 1st April 2017. Therefore it is proposed to allocate £30k for the fund administration fee to London Community Foundation (LCF) from the 2016-17 budget and the grant funding itself from the 2017-18 budget, subject to the allocation of victims’ funding from MoJ being confirmed. 

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is proposed that the DMPC approves up to £30,000 of funding for VCSE service provision and capacity building.

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 6, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Restorative Justice
     

    1. Restorative Justice provides an important opportunity to help victims cope and recover from the effects of crime and for the offender to understand the impact that the crime has had on their victims.  

 

  1. The provision of Restorative Justice (RJ) is a duty under the EU Directive. The London approach is to ensure the availability of victim-led RJ at any point in a victims’ journey through the CJS, and to drive innovation and integration at a local level. 

 

Pan-London Restorative Justice Service

 

  1. MOPAC intends to commission a primarily victim led pan London Restorative Justice service underpinned by two core elements;
  • Service Part 1: To develop a pan London ‘Hub and Spoke’ Restorative Justice (RJ) operating model
  • Service Part 2: To run a pan London ‘Hub and Spoke’ RJ Service. This will include;
    • running a service ‘Hub’ to handle referrals and generate RJ cases and processes;
    • delivering primarily victim – led RJ provision and casework through ‘local spokes’; and
    • integrating the Service with wider provision/ partners in London, maximising the value of RJ provision more broadly.

 

  1. The model will provide a platform for innovation and an ability to test the impact on victims and offenders and the wider cost effectiveness of this approach compared to other criminal justice interventions.

 

  1. The Service will mobilise and launch in 2016 and will run for a total of 2.5 years. This Service will work closely alongside the Victim Service Re-design programme. This programme is part of an ambitious ‘whole system’ approach to supporting victims of crime to cope and recover, protecting the most vulnerable and driving overall victim satisfaction and public confidence in the CJS.

 

  1. The maximum value of the service will be £1.3m and MOPAC has previously committed £750,000 to the provision of a pan-London service (DMPC/D 2015 46 refers).  The DMPC is therefore asked to approve the allocation of a further maximum of £550,000 for the development and delivery of RJ services in London.

 

The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 7, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

[1]             Those areas which support services should aim to help victims with during the course of their intervention - mental and physical health; shelter and accommodation; family friends and children; education, skills and employment; drugs and alcohol; finance and benefits; outlook and attitudes; social interactions.

[2]             https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-code-of-practice-for-victims-of-crime

[3]              http://ec.europa.eu/justice/criminal/files/victims/guidance_victims_rights_directive_en.pdf

Change Programme

 

  1. Victim Service Pathfinder – Future Delivery Model

 

  1. MOPAC is working with Criminal Justice System (CJS) agencies in London to develop an ambitious end to end ‘whole system’ approach to improving the victim experience. This work encompasses many of the findings and recommendations from the Newlove Review:
    • Ensure that the provision of core support and specialist services is underpinned by clear referral protocols;
    • Commissioning strategy should recognise the need for a personalised, victim-centred approach as no two victims will react in the same way and offence-type is not a reliable indicator of need;
    • Develop fully integrated and individualised support which links to local services and community organisations and which facilitates the identification and support of vulnerable victims and those who self-refer to services;
    • Help improve VCSE and CJS staff awareness of and responsiveness to the diverse range of victims’ needs to ensure a more sympathetic service;
    • Develop a framework that enables victim satisfaction and confidence to be understood, measured and monitored across all parts of the CJS;
    • Improve the way that victim data is recorded and shared across the CJS and support organisations to enable appropriate, tailored responses based on the needs of the individual;
    • Conduct detailed mapping of the victim journey and support pathways in order to understand why so few victims engage with the CJS; and
    • Introduce reforms to further improve the effectiveness of the CJS to respond to victims’ needs, thus increasing confidence and engagement in the longer term

 

  1. The first stage of the project involved mapping and re-designing the current victim journey in terms of activity across CJS agencies and statutory local services. The evidence shows that the victims journey is fundamentally compromised by the structures and complexity of the CJS: 
  • it is difficult for the victim experience to work well within a system that is focused on the outcome of achieving justice rather than supporting the victim;
  • the victim’s journey is predicated by the suspects journey;
  • the victim is treated as a witness rather than a victim; and
  • there is no overall ownership of the victim journey end-to-end

 

  1. The emerging perspective is that the victims’ experience could be marginally improved through changes in practice in individual organisations, but a victim-centred and integrated CJS can only be achieved through more transformational reform.

 

  1. We have secured in principle agreement with statutory partners in the London CJS, to implement a Victim Service Pathfinder programme to operationally trial and test a new model for supporting victims through the CJS, based on agreed Design Principles.

 

  1. In order to move forward with this work, MOPAC will together with partners, build upon the work to date to establish the ‘actual ‘costs and benefits to ensure the programme can be delivered within the current budget envelope.

 

  1. Once this has been established the intention will be to implement the Pathfinder to trial and test the practical elements of the new model in a defined area within existing criminal justice structures in London before rolling it out to all areas. The Pathfinder will test:
    • the effectiveness of a new Victim Care Co-ordinator role supporting victims as a single point of contact;
    • whether a single needs assessment can capture all the necessary information to support the victim without the need to repeat the process at each stage of the CJS;
    • how easily statutory partners and VCSE providers can share consent & information;
    • how to improve first contact with victims and whether this can help to manage the victim journey;
    • the effectiveness and usage of a new website and interactive self-service portal (funds have been previously agreed for this – DMPC Decision 2015 46 refers);
    • the capacity for cultural change in the CJS through training programmes; and
    • agreed cross cutting Key Performance Indicators.

 

  1. This is an ambitious programme of work which relies on the full participation of statutory partners in the CJS in London. Extensive engagement work has taken place and continues to be high on the agenda as the programme progresses. A full engagement plan has been drawn up to ensure that every eventuality is covered as we seek to ensure that the Victim Service Pathfinder continues to represent a shared vision.

 

  1. There will be two levels of Victim Care Co-ordinator. The Single Point of Contact for enhanced victims and those assessed as needing this level, and the Duty Team Function for victims with lower levels of need, victims who do not wish to report to the police and witnesses who are not victims.

 

  1. The Single Point of Contact Victim Care Co-ordinators will provide clarity and reassurance for victims who currently are contacted by many different CJS agencies and staff. This role will include the following elements:
    • carry out the needs assessment and draw up a care plan;
    • make referrals to specialist support;
    • explain the CJS process;
    • provide investigation updates; and
    • advocate on victims’ behalf

 

  1. The Duty Team Function Care Co-ordinators will provide a similar role, supporting victims with no need (at point of reporting crime) who may not require any further support to cope and recover. The duty function allows for demand to be managed effectively, so that victims of crime are not provided services that they do not need. These victims will be able to contact the duty Victim Care Coordinator for case updates and explanations of the CJS process. The duty function will be available to respond to victims, however the victim will not be provided with a named Victim Care Coordinator. If the victim’s case goes to trial, (or duty identifies a need pre-trial) they will receive an allocated Victim Care Coordinator and a Victim Support Worker to help them participate in the CJS and attendance at court as appropriate. The duty function will also support non-reporters, giving access to a Victim Care Coordinator for a proportionate needs assessment, with appropriate access and referral in to practical and emotional support, and specialist support services.

 

  1. The Single Needs Assessment is a live document for capturing all needs assessments in the same place. It reduces the duplication of effort across criminal justice agencies, and eradicates the unnecessary burden on victims to have to repeat their story multiple times. The adaptation of consent and information sharing will facilitate this.

 

  1. Enhanced initial contact will ensure that the service for victims takes advantage of the opportunities available during the initial contact to manage the victims’ expectations.

 

  1. The website and interactive victim portal will provide a comprehensive service to point victims of crime to sources of information, advice and help in London. It is intended to act as a complementary but distinct service to existing website e.g. https://www.victimsinformationservice.org.uk/ and https://www.victimsupport.org.uk/.  

 

  1. A joint cultural change and training programme will support the strong leadership required to articulate the shared vision and the integrated approach to deliver it. It will also increase the ability to build mutual trust and collaborative relationships across the agencies, reinforcing how the criminal justice agencies can work together in a coordinated approach to support victims. The training will be consistent across CJS agencies.

 

  1. Implementing cross-cutting Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) will provide a coordinated approach and common ownership of the new model. Currently each CJS agency works to its own KPIs. The new KPIs will focus on:
    • Improved collaboration between CJS agencies;
    • Good quality, consistent information across agencies;
    • Improved first contact experience;
    • Improved victim and witness participation in justice;
    • Personalisation of advice and support;
    • Avoidable repeat victimisation;  and
    • Improved self-confidence of victims to cope and recover

 

  1. These KPIs will also serve as the testable elements of the Pathfinder – all the changes to process detailed above will be subject to evaluation to ensure that they are having the desired effect (as represented by the KPIs) on the victim experience through the CJS.

 

  1. Some of these elements may involve a direct commissioning role for MOPAC others will involve co-commissioning with our statutory partners. The Cost Benefit Analysis work completed in January 2016 provides high-level guidance on the likely commissioning costs of implementing the new Victim Service Pathfinder model, but as discussed in section 8.5 more detailed work will be undertaken to establish ‘actual’ costs.

 

  1. The implementation costs of the Pathfinder will be partly borne through the grant agreement with Victim Support (see section 3), which will be integral to the delivery of the new model. The Pathfinder is supported by Victim Support as the main provider of support services in London. A budget is provided to Victim Support for this work within the renewed grant agreement, the total for which is below the level of previous years’ demonstrating further efficiency.

 

  1. It is also proposed that additional resources are secured to support the change and integration of multiple services, which will include overall programme management, communication and training.

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is proposed that the DMPC approve up to £705,000 of funding for the Victim Service Pathfinder work in 2016-17.

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 8, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

  1. Independent Review of Victim Services in London

 

  1. The Independent Review of Victims’ Services in London, commissioned in 2014 (DMPCD 2013-198 refers) and overseen by the Victims’ Commissioner, Baroness Newlove, remains important in ensuring the MOPAC victims’ strategy is appropriately targeted. The Review made thirteen recommendations, which have informed MOPAC’s approach (see Appendix 1). 

 

  1. In order to make informed commissioning decisions for services for victims of crime, it is proposed that MOPAC commissions a refresh for an independent and comprehensive analysis of victim support services across London to consider how well victims’ needs are currently met and how services might be improved in the future. 
     
  2. Just as the last Review did, this refreshed Review will represent a large part of the knowledge base for forthcoming commissioning decisions for services for victims of crime in London.  It is proposed that the refreshed Review also undertakes ‘deep dives’ into particular areas of provision, particularly hate crime and support for victims with mental health difficulties.   Aside from the Review, MOPAC will continue to engage with victims, providers and statutory bodies to further this knowledge base.

 

  1. On the basis of the above activities, it is therefore proposed that the DMPC approve £125,000 of funding for MOPAC to run a competitive tendering process to deliver an update on the Independent Review of Victim Services in London. 

 

  1. The DMPC is asked to delegate responsibility for the finalisation of planning and grant arrangements and extensions related to the work described in section 9, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer.

 

 

  1. Resourcing
     

    1. MOPAC is undertaking a significant programme of work to develop and deliver effective services to victims of crime in London.  This programme of work is becoming increasingly diverse and complex, with three specific work strands being delivered simultaneously – the maintenance of existing service delivery, the commissioning of new services in response to changing need and demand, and the development and implementation of a new approach to the provision of victims support services across the CJS.  Additional capacity and skills are therefore required to ensure MOPAC can continue to effectively deliver the full programme of work.
       
    2. It is therefore proposed that the DMPC approve £100,000 to secure two  additional posts within MOPAC to act as a central resource for the effective delivery of the entire programme as set out in sections 3 - 9; additional resources to further the change programme pathfinder are set out in section 8. 

 

 

  1. Financial Comments

 

  1. Our commissioning strategy is focussed on ensuring compliance with the EU Directive on Victims' and the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime; addressing areas of demand for direct support as identified through victim data analysis and MOPAC's strategic priorities and ambitions; developing opportunities for self-directed support; better support for victims in the criminal justice system in London and, where possible, on providing services that complement other provision and funding streams, avoiding duplication. Services will also need to be compliant with the forthcoming Victims’ Law, which is a manifesto pledge of the current Government, though timescales for this are not yet known.

 

  1. The overarching commissioning strategy and the commitments detailed above have been developed and aligned to MOPAC’s outcome-based approach.  As such, all grant agreements and contracts that may be developed within this programme will continue to contain clearly defined outcomes linked to the broader IVS approach, as well as to MOPAC’s strategic ambitions, and will be managed on that basis.  Data gathered through the monitoring processes will continue to be used to iteratively inform service development and delivery. 

 

  1. The Ministry of Justice has allocated funding using a population-based formula.  As a result, London has received 14.87 per cent of the total funding pot, despite accounting for around 20 per cent of all police recorded crime and approximately 25 per cent of all referrals to Victim Support. 

 

  1. MoJ has allocated £10.09m to MOPAC for 2016/17 service delivery. The grant agreement stipulates that the services supported through this funding must be compliant with the EU Directive that the services must be appropriately publicised, and that MOPAC must specify within its annual police and crime plan the services commissioned within this grant funding stream. Additionally the grant stipulates that funding must be spent by 31st March 2017.
     
  2. It should further be noted that the work programme described in this decision does not represent the full range of activities being delivered to support victims of crime, and only relates to those that will be funded from the 2016/17 MoJ Victims Grant.  Further work to support victims of crime is ongoing and funded from MOPAC core budget to the value of £8.62 million per annum. This funds specialist sexual violence, domestic abuse and hate crime services which are commissioned regionally and local commissioning.

 

 

 

  1. Legal Comments
     

    1. MOPAC’s general powers are set out in the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 (the 2011 Act). Section 3(6) of the 2011 Act provides that MOPAC must “secure the maintenance of the metropolitan police service and secure that the metropolitan police service is efficient and effective.” Under Schedule 3, paragraph 7 MOPAC has wide incidental powers to “do anything which is calculated to facilitate, or is conducive or incidental to, the exercise of the functions of the Office.” Paragraph 7(2) (a) provides that this includes entering into contracts and other agreements.
       
    2. Section 143 (1) (b) of the Anti-Social Behaviour Crime and Policing Act 2014 provides an express power for MOPAC, as a local policing body, to provide or commission services “intended by the local policing body to help victims or witnesses of, or other persons affected by, offences and anti-social behaviour.” Section 143(3) specifically allows MOPAC to make grants in connection with such arrangements and any grant may be made subject to any conditions that MOPAC thinks appropriate. 
       
    3. The powers in section 143 were given to MOPAC following the Government’s response to the consultation Getting it Right for Victims and Witnesses (2 July 2012) in which it set out a package of reforms to the way in which support services for victims of crime are to be provided. Section 143 creates a clear statutory basis for the proposals set out in this decision form, namely to award grant funding to Victim Support and to a number of other bodies as set out above for the provision of victim-support related services.
       
  1. Under MOPAC’s Scheme of Delegation, approval of the strategy for the award of individual grants and the award of all individual grants (for crime reduction or other purposes) is a matter generally reserved to the DMPC (paragraph 5.6). The release of funding in accordance with the proposals set out in this decision form is accordingly to be approved by the DMPC. The delegation of responsibility for the finalisation of planning and contractual/grant arrangements, including relevant terms and the signing of agreements, to the Chief Operating Officer is in accordance with the general power of delegation in paragraph 1.7.
     

 

  1. Equality Comments
     

    1. MOPAC is required to comply with the public sector equality duty set out in section 149(1) of the Equality Act 2010. This requires MOPAC to have due regard to the need to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations by reference to people with protected characteristics. The protected characteristics are: age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.
       
    2. As highlighted through the Independent Review commissioned by MOPAC and through analysis of police crime data, there are some communities that are over-represented amongst victimisation data and/or who fall within the scope of the EU Directive, i.e. victims of more serious crimes, vulnerable victims, particularly those whose circumstances make it difficult for them to access support, and repeat or persistently targeted victims, who must receive a prioritised service. In addition, the analysis indicates that those living in more deprived neighbourhoods are more likely to be targeted. 
       
    3. The proposals detailed in this decision will ensure that a victims’ referral mechanism is provided for all victims of crime in line with the EU Directive on Victims of Crime. In addition, these proposals will ensure enhanced provision through Victim Support for young, vulnerable and repeat and persistently targeted victims (DMPC decision 2014 110 refers). The funding being provided for specialised services will support a range of provision for victims suffering from hate crime (disability, faith, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender, and race), domestic and sexual violence, vulnerable victims of economic crime and young victims of crime. In doing so, our commissioning approach will support vulnerable and repeat victims, and particular sections of the community who are over-represented amongst victims of crime.
       
    4. As part of the service re-design process and the new grant agreements that are being put in place for Victim Support and for the delivery of a range of specialised services, additional information and data is being gathered and will further inform the development and delivery of services to address the range of victim needs across London.

 

  1. Service data from the current grant arrangement with Victim Support shows that fewer than half their clients describe themselves as White British. Data from the MPS is shown in the table below and shows that victims’ ethnicity generally follows the overall population ethnicity trends. However, compared to the general population:
    • There is a higher proportion of victims of Violence Against the Person who are of Black ethnicity relative to population
    • There is a higher proportion of victims of Burglary and Theft & Handling of White ethnicity

 

 

Burglary

Criminal Damage

Robbery

Sexual Offences

Theft & Handling

Violence Against The Person

Population Ethnicity

White

66%

60%

56%

64%

65%

54%

60%

Asian

19%

18%

24%

13%

14%

19%

19%

Black

9%

16%

13%

16%

11%

19%

13%

Chinese/

Other

5%

4%

5%

4%

8%

5%

3%

Mixed

1%

2%

2%

3%

2%

3%

5%

  1. Service data from the current grant arrangement with Victim Support shows that over 19% of victims are under 25 years of age.

 

  1. Service data from the current grant also shows that 51.6% of Victim Support’s clients self-identify as male and 48.4% as female. Also 26.72% of Victim Support’s clients self-identify as having a disability.

 

  1. MOPAC’s service provision and commissioning intention reflects and takes account of these findings (see sections 3 to 9).