Recycling of Free Newspapers on the TfL Network (2)

Meeting: 
MQT on 2019-03-21
Session date: 
March 21, 2019
Reference: 
2019/6330
Question By: 
Joanne McCartney
Organisation: 
Labour Group
Asked Of: 
The Mayor

Question

Are the free newspapers distributed on the transport network separated and recycled from general waste?

Answers

Answer for Recycling of Free Newspapers on the TfL Network (2)
Recycling of Free Newspapers on the TfL Network (2)

Recycling of Free Newspapers on the TfL Network (2)

Answered By: 
The Mayor

Transport for London (TfL) is doing a huge amount to reduce the amount of waste on the network and recycles waste collected on the network wherever possible.

Sixty-six million newspaper copies are distributed on the transport network each year. TfL collects them at London Underground stations and depots via its cleaning teams, in hoop bins, and bins that are split to keep newspapers separate from other waste.  

The newspapers picked off trains by cleaning staff are separated and sent for recycling. In 2017/18 London Underground collected 11,500 tonnes of waste from its stations and over 28 per cent of this was recycled. TfL does not hold data on the on the percentage of newspapers recycled.

All waste, including newspapers, put into hoop bins goes to be incinerated at waste-to-energy plants.

Where waste is not recycled it is usually because of contamination, for example food contamination from half-full coffee cups. To discourage food contamination, TfL has conducted a successful trial using bins that are split to keep newspapers separate from other waste. TfL is now looking at rolling these divided bins out across the network to ensure as much waste is recycled as possible while keeping stations clear of litter.

TfL keeps its network as clean as possible by carefully deploying cleaning teams at times and places when litter builds up. During peak, all cleaning teams are dedicated to picking up newspapers.