Ban on junk food advertising on the transport network (1)

Meeting: 
MQT on 2019-03-21
Session date: 
March 21, 2019
Reference: 
2019/6093
Question By: 
Caroline Russell
Organisation: 
City Hall Greens
Asked Of: 
The Mayor

Question

Why are you allowing exceptions to the proposed junk food advertising ban, and does this follow the advice of Government health experts?

Answers

Answer for Ban on junk food advertising on the transport network (1)
Ban on junk food advertising on the transport network (1)

Ban on junk food advertising on the transport network (1)

Answered By: 
The Mayor

TfL’s Healthier Food and Drink Advertising Policy is designed to reduce children’s exposure to adverts for food and drink that contribute to London’s high rate of child obesity.  It is part of a range of measures outlined in my London Food Strategy to address London’s high rates of child obesity.

The policy uses the PHE recommended Nutrient Profiling Model to define products that are high in saturated fat, sugar and/or salt and are therefore considered to be ‘less healthy’. This is the same model the Government and its health experts are proposing to use for their 9pm restriction around junk food advertising on Television and online which they published on 18 March 2019.

The policy includes an exceptions process because we do not want to restrict products from being advertised which genuinely do not contribute to childhood obesity. This issue was raised by stakeholders in our consultation on the policy.

Requests for exceptions will be considered by TfL on a case-by-case basis, with guidance from an advisory panel including the GLA’s food team, and health team, and advisers selected by the national food alliance, Sustain. The independent evaluation of the policy will include the exceptions process and TfL continues to work with brands and advertisers to ensure they fully understand and comply with the policy.