The March for a People's Vote

Meeting: 
MQT on 2018-11-22
Session date: 
November 22, 2018
Reference: 
2018/3088
Question By: 
Peter Whittle
Organisation: 
UKIP
Asked Of: 
The Mayor

Question

On 20th October, I noticed posters with the text 'March For A People's Vote' being advertised on the London Underground, which I found surprising, as I am aware that political advertising is not permitted. I note that regulation 2.3 (n) of TfL's Advertising Policy states: 'More particularly, an advertisement will be unacceptable if: it promotes a party political cause or electioneering. Advertisements must conform to TfL's policy on use of resources, with particular care exercised in pre-election periods.'*   Given that the march was part of the attempt to overturn the decision by the British People to leave the European Union in a referendum held on 23 June 2016, could you please explain why that rule was not followed on this occasion, or are we now in a situation where it's one rule for the Mayor and another one for everybody else?

*[1] http://content.tfl.gov.uk/tfl-advertising-policy.pdf

Answer

The March for a People's Vote

The March for a People's Vote

Answered By: 
The Mayor

The People’s Vote ran one campaign on the Transport for London (TfL) advertising estate. This was a one-day campaign on the 18 October, which featured on 11 digital escalator panel runs and 50 LCD screens across the network.

This campaign was reviewed by TfL as per the usual process and was found not to contravene the advertising policy.

The TfL Advertising policy is very clear: “an advertisement will be unacceptable if: it promotes a party political cause or electioneering. Advertisements must conform to TfL's policy on use of resources, with particular care exercised in pre-election periods.”

The advertisement made no reference to Brexit, and TfL did not consider the advertising to be promoting a cause associated with a specific party. In addition, TfL received assurances from The People’s Vote that it does not receive any funding from political parties, and the advertisement did not encourage the reader to vote in a certain way.