Evidence of Bus Driver Fatigue as a Cause of Accidents

Meeting: 
MQT on 2018-06-21
Session date: 
June 21, 2018
Reference: 
2018/1316
Question By: 
Caroline Pidgeon
Organisation: 
Liberal Democrats
Asked Of: 
The Mayor

Question

In a response to a freedom of information question (https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/incidents_of_bus_drivers_falling#outgoing-336987) asked in January 2014, Transport for London (TfL) responded that it had no evidence of accidents being caused by bus drivers falling asleep behind the wheel. Given what we now know about the likely causes of the Croydon Tram crash in November 2016 are you confident that such a statement by TfL is still applicable?

Answer

Answer for Evidence of Bus Driver Fatigue as a Cause of Accidents

Answer for Evidence of Bus Driver Fatigue as a Cause of Accidents

Answered By: 
The Mayor

As set out in my response to Mayor's Question 2018/1131, Transport for London (TfL) takes fatigue management seriously and, as part of its response to the learning from the investigation into the Sandilands tragedy, is reviewing fatigue management systems at all its Surface Transport operations contractors. This includes procuring independent research into bus driver fatigue, which will help look at what action might be needed. TfL also recently held a fatigue management workshop with its bus operators.

There is currently limited evidence linking bus driver fatigue to collisions. As set out in my response to Mayor's Question 2018/1132, fatigue is recorded by the Metropolitan Police Service as a contributory factor in less than 0.5 per cent of collisions involving a bus or coach. This factor can apply to any driver involved in the collisions, not necessarily the bus driver. 

TfL will continue its research into fatigue as part of its comprehensive bus safety programme and will keep working to improve driver welfare as it implements my Vision Zero approach to road and bus safety.