Transparency about Collisions Involving Buses

Meeting: 
MQT on 2017-01-18
Session date: 
January 18, 2017
Reference: 
2017/0038
Question By: 
Caroline Pidgeon
Organisation: 
Liberal Democrats
Asked Of: 
The Mayor

Question

At a PACTS conference on the 14th June 2016 Lilli Matson, Head of Strategy and Outcome Planning, stated in her presentation "Buses are four times more likely to be involved in a KSI collision with a pedestrian than would be expected for their share of traffic.”  Given your support for increased transparency and accountability for private operators of our Public Transport Services, please set out your specific reasons for rejecting my two requests as set in Question 29016/2845 and Question 2016/2485 for TfL to tweet the operator and route number of any bus involved in a KSI collision on @TravelAlerts and @TfLBusAlerts?   

Answer

Answer for Transparency about Collisions Involving Buses

Answer for Transparency about Collisions Involving Buses

Answered By: 
The Mayor

TfL has launched a ground-breaking Bus Safety Programme to drive down collisions between buses and other road users in London.  This will be informed by new detailed research on the causes and contributory factors behind fatal bus collisions, leading to new and innovative responses to enhance bus safety. This includes a new vehicle specification from next year, which will see London lead the world in mandating specific safety equipment on its newest vehicles.

 

The data you suggest publishing would not improve transparency as tweets are useful warnings of disruption, but are prone to misinformation about events, as there is no time to corroborate them before they go live. For this reason, they are not suited to recording and reporting, but are useful as alerts about disruption.

 

TfL adopts an open data approach to bus collision records from its operators and publishes statistics quarterly on its website to ensure stakeholders are kept up to date. The quarterly bus collision data goes through an assurance process to help ensure it is as accurate as possible.

 

While buses are more likely to be involved in an incident than their share of traffic, the overall record on bus safety in London is good. The number of people killed or seriously injured (KSI) in collisions involving buses or coaches continues to fall year on year, with a 56 per cent decline in KSIs in 12 months to July 2016, the most recent figures available from the police, against the 2005-09 baseline.

 

However, I am clear that more must to done to reduce collisions and casualties further, and I am committed to making this happen as part of my Vision Zero approach to road danger reduction.