East West Cycle Superhighway – effect on journeys into Central London by Road Vehicle

Meeting: 
MQT on 2015-09-16
Session date: 
September 16, 2015
Reference: 
2015/2777
Question By: 
John Biggs
Organisation: 
Labour Group
Asked Of: 
The Mayor
Category: 

Question

I strongly support the use of Lower Thames Street/The Embankment for cycle  traffic, with segregation and priority. However, the design being built-out is a disaster for other road users and will have an impact on London’s  economy, which does need road traffic other than bicycles. The road works  on Lower Thames Street, together with changes to junction priorities and  traffic light timings is causing a catastrophic increase in journey times for motorised traffic. Are you prepared to take a lead on challenging this, and urgently meet with those affected by these changes, or are you going to  continue as an absent mayor, delaying this important work to a well-intended but misguided officer in the Mayor’s Office?

Answer

Answer for East West Cycle Superhighway – effect on journeys into Central London by Road Vehicle

Answer for East West Cycle Superhighway – effect on journeys into Central London by Road Vehicle

Answered By: 
The Mayor

I appreciate your support for segregation on Lower Thames Street and the Embankment.

In order to provide segregation, it is necessary to remove a traffic lane. During the construction phase, as with the construction phase of any road project, it is inevitable that users of the road will experience delays, but TfL has traffic engineers and operators working around the clock to ensure impacts are minimised. Conditions will improve as the work starts to reach its conclusion early next year.

The final build designs for the Superhighway have been significantly modified from those originally proposed to ensure that the permanent impact of the work is kept to a minimum. TfL has undertaken extensive design and traffic modelling work to understand the impact, and conducted one of the largest public consultation exercises in its history. As a result, I am confident that the scheme balances the standards that you and cyclists seek, while keeping the network moving for all road users. The proportion of commercial vehicles using the road is between 20 and 25 per cent.

At Tower Hill, new developments have the potential to allow improvements to how the gyratory works - without compromising the newly-installed segregated Superhighway. I have asked TfL to look at options for such improvements with this in mind, and I am happy to share the results of this work when they become available.

Compensation paid by Train Operating Companies (1)