Met Police investigations (1)

Meeting: 
MQT on 2015-09-16
Session date: 
September 16, 2015
Reference: 
2015/2715
Question By: 
Jenny Jones
Organisation: 
City Hall Greens
Asked Of: 
The Mayor
Category: 

Question

How many collisions involving a serious injury to either a pedestrian, or a cyclist, went beyond the preliminary investigation stage by the Met Police in 2014? Can you outline the various stages of a full investigation and the circumstances in which an investigation would not proceed beyond a preliminary investigation?

Answer

Answer for Met Police investigations (1)

Answer for Met Police investigations (1)

Answered By: 
The Mayor

MPS data states there were 458 collisions in total.

All the 458 collisions were investigated beyond the preliminary stage. All were attended by the Serious Collision Investigation unit (SCIU) and all events were treated as crime scenes.

Local Borough officers provide the first response. Based on the information available to them they will make the decision if it is classified as a serious injury collision. This is dictated to by the overall circumstances and if the injury can be deemed to be life threatening or changing. If the matter is deemed life threatening or changing the first responders will request for a Roads & Transport Policing Command (RTPC) supervisor attendance. It is this supervisor's decision to call out the Serious Collision Investigation Unit (SCIU).

The FCI will conduct a full examination of the collision site and detectives will progress 'secondary' investigation focused on gathering evidence and supporting the victim and their family.  An accredited evidential review Officer (ERO) will decide if the evidence reaches the threshold for referral to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) for charging advice or if no further action is taken direct to HM Coroners for inquest. 

In general terms cases are not proceeded with respect of Criminal charges if there is no available evidence of culpability, however robust review processes are in place to provide sufficient objectivity in the decision-making process.