Inappropriate use of cyclist warning stickers

Meeting: 
MQT on 2015-05-21
Session date: 
May 21, 2015
Reference: 
2015/1512
Question By: 
Darren Johnson
Organisation: 
City Hall Greens
Asked Of: 
The Mayor
Category: 

Question

Thank you for your answer to question 2015/0852. What steps are TfL taking specifically to get all Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS) registered vehicles below 3.5 tonnes such as small lorries, vans and cars which do not have a blind spot to remove 'cyclist stay back' stickers?

Answer

Answer for Inappropriate use of cyclist warning stickers

Answer for Inappropriate use of cyclist warning stickers

Answered By: 
The Mayor

The Highway Code's Rule 159 describes how vehicles of all sizes have blind spots and describes them as the areas around the vehicle which a driver is unable to see either directly or by using mirrors. Vehicle blindspots increase the risks to other road users, particularly cyclists and pedestrians

The FORS standard require fleet operators to fit approved blind spot warning signage to vehicles over 3.5 tonne gross vehicle weight, as these vehicles have larger blind spots. FORS guidance on approved blind spot warning signage is very clear and has been communicated to all FORS accredited operators via e-news bulletins, the FORS website and in FORS training and toolkits. 

FORS has distributed around 65,000 approved blind spot warning signs and these are sent out with guidance on how they are to be used.  This and further guidance on signage requirements is now available on the FORS website and can be viewed here: http://www.fors-online.org.uk/cms/warning-signage.

The FORS audit process checks that approved blind spot warning signage is fitted to vehicles over 3.5 tonne gross vehicle weight. It marks down operators that use non-approved or badly placed stickers or where this signage is fitted to smaller vehicles.

Since my response to 2015/0852, TfL has made several communications to FORS operators on appropriate signage making clear that blind spot stickers should not be applied to smaller vehicles  and the FORS accreditation criteria has been updated to reflect the new advice.

Operators who are not accredited to FORS may choose to use a range of styles of hazard warning signage. TfL is working with the industry to promote the use of consistent signage by operators.