Explanation of New Safety Reporting System of Road Traffic Collisions involving London Buses (2006-2014) (1)

Meeting: 
MQT on 2014-12-17
Session date: 
December 17, 2014
Reference: 
2014/5010
Question By: 
Darren Johnson
Organisation: 
City Hall Greens
Asked Of: 
The Mayor
Category: 

Question

Can you explain the reasons for Transport for London changing its collision data to an apparently more 'user-friendly' format that has unfortunately resulted in it reporting a 25% increase in bus collisions after it introduced 'Quality Performance Contracts' in 2009-2010?

Answer

Answer for Explanation of New Safety Reporting System of Road Traffic Collisions involving London Buses (2006-2014) (1)

Answer for Explanation of New Safety Reporting System of Road Traffic Collisions involving London Buses (2006-2014) (1)

Answered By: 
The Mayor

The IRIS system was upgraded in 2009 to make it simpler, clearer and easier to record incidents accurately. This led to a change in the proportion of incidents recorded as collisions because of more accurate classification. Quality incentive contracts were in fact introduced in 2003 and this is not related.

The upgraded IRIS system required bus operators to classify the nature of the event as a collision or something different at the outset of recording it. Previously, a minor accident could be entered as a minor personal injury without linking it to a collision.

The statistics therefore do not indicate more collisions are taking place on London's roads. This is borne out by the fact hospitalised injuires have been falling from 2006 to 2014, and indicate passengers are travelling on a bus network that is already very safe and becoming safer. A similar improving trend on the bus network is apparent from STATS19 data which is collected by the Metropolitan Police.  The number of people killed or seriously injured in collisions (KSI) involving a bus or coach has more than halved in the past decade to 195 KSIs in 2013. The latest figures show that there is one KSI for every 10 million bus journeys undertaken a year in London, at a time when the total amount of kilometres operated has steadily risen.

In 2013, I published Safe Streets for London with TfL, which has an ambition to work towards roads free from death and serious injury, and reduce killed and serious injury (KSI) casualties by 40 per cent by 2020.