Role of Education, Training & Employment in Lifting People out of Poverty (Supplementary) [1]

Session date: 
July 19, 2006
Question By: 
Elizabeth Howlett
Organisation: 
GLA Conservatives
Asked Of: 
John Ross, Rt Revd Peter Wheatley, Kate Green, Keith Faulkner

Question

Certainly my perception is that the LSC has failed to encourage a breadth of skills training, and that's why we have this deficit in the building trade. Joiners, plumbers, they are all Europeans coming in and filling these jobs, and the indigenous population in young people leaving schools are not getting a chance because they do not have the skills and there is somehow no way that they can get the training. So, I am afraid, this is very true and I see this all the time in my constituencies. There is, actually, a wonderful life for people who have skills in their hands, and they can earn a very good living for themselves and for their families, but they are not getting a chance now.

Answer

Answer for Role of Education, Training & Employment in Lifting People out of Poverty (Supplementary) [1]

Answer for Role of Education, Training & Employment in Lifting People out of Poverty (Supplementary) [1]

Answered By: 
John Ross, Rt Revd Peter Wheatley, Kate Green, Keith Faulkner

Keith Faulkner CBE (Chair of the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry Skills and Employment Forum): I accept the principles of what you say, and I honestly do not have the information in hand to rebut that directly. I would still say, in the context of today's debate, that attracting young people from some of the families we are addressing to pursue that sort of course of gaining skills is actually the biggest challenge of all; it is not making the training available, it is getting these people to believe that they can and wish to do it.

John Ross (Director, Economic and Business Policy, GLA): Again, the big jobs story in the city in the last 30 years is the loss of 600,000 jobs in the manufacturing industry, and the gain of 600,000 jobs in financial and business services. That dwarfs every other thing which takes place in the city, even if some of them make spectacular things for the tabloid newspapers, and so on.

The Rt Revd Peter Wheatley (Bishop of Edmonton): I don't dispute at all the very valuable points John (Ross) has just made, but we were earlier talking about absolute and relative poverty, and where relative poverty seems to impinge, where inequality impinges is the lack of confidence in certain groups to be able to take up the opportunities that are there, which is what I heard Keith (Faulkner) say. Again, churches and the faith groups and the voluntary sector are partners here, and can help.