Training (Supplementary) [2]

Session date: 
January 1, 2001
Question By: 
Angie Bray
Organisation: 
GLA Conservatives
Asked Of: 
Toby Harris

Question

I would just ask you about the story which I am sure a number of us read, that you have obviously just despatched with a, "No, I can"t say a lot" but actually there were members of the Police Federation who were happy to say that they had real concerns about the fact that some of these people were spending a number of weeks doing gardening because there were not actually the spaces for them on the training courses. I don't think it is just grabbed out of air. Clearly it has been confirmed by members of the Police Federation that that they are aware of people who have been doing that gardening. Doesn"t the fact that we have not even got the training spaces available to get all these numbers through suggest that all our talk earlier in the year about these 1,000 plus police officers for London is all pie in the sky, if you cannot actually get the people through in the first place.

Supplementary To: 

Answer

Answer for Training (Supplementary) [2]

Answer for Training (Supplementary) [2]

Answered By: 
Toby Harris

I repeat the answer I gave. It is not possible to confirm newspaper reports and my information is the newspaper reports are misleading, as often is the case with statements that are simply accredited often to unnamed members of the Police Federation. Some recruits do take longer than 18 weeks to complete their training but this is not because of a lack of training places. There are a number of reasons why the training period may be extended; they include illness or injury and domestic or personal reasons. Some officers who show potential but are struggling with the course may be offered the opportunity to repeat parts of the course. Over the last year an average of 6% of the officers in each intake repeated parts of the course and this extended their total training time. The fact is that the capacity at Hendon Training School has been expanded steadily to cater for increased intakes.