OPDC gender pay gap report: March 2016 data

About the report

The Mayor’s manifesto contained a commitment to publish a gender pay report for the Greater London Authority (GLA) and its functional bodies, with a requirement that work is undertaken to narrow any gaps. The Mayor sees this as necessary in order to address any inequalities so that male and female employees receive the same pay for the same work.

The Old Oak and Park Royal Development Corporation (OPDC) was established on 1 April 2015, and is the Mayor’s fifth and youngest functional body to date.

Salaries at the OPDC are determined through the (Hay) job evaluation scheme. Job evaluation evaluates the job and not the post holder. It makes no reference to gender or any other personal characteristics of existing or existing or potential job holders. Therefore, we are satisfied that the OPDC is paying the same salary to roles of equal value.

On the calculations for gender pay reporting, the Mandatory Gender Pay Gap Reporting - Public Sector Employers Government Consultation recommends that relevant public authorities will need to publish their overall mean and median gender pay gaps in line with the requirements which are being introduced for private and voluntary sector employers.

Whilst it will be compulsory, the requirement is not here yet for private, public and voluntary sector organisations 250+ to publish pay gender information. In line with the regulations the OPDC has no requirement to provide this information, as it's a small organisation. However, the Mayor has said that all functional bodies regardless of size will report on gender and pay. Due to the size of the organisation, very small changes in staffing numbers can have a significant impact upon the percentages and overall findings of the audit.

The data below represents the gender pay gap data for the OPDC as at the end of March 2016.

Overall gender pay gap summary

In table 1, the data shows that there is a marginal difference between the mean and median hourly pay for female and male. The mean hourly pay shows a negative gender pay gap whilst the median figures show a positive gender pay gap. The median data, for men and women is very close, if the figures were rounded up this would show a balance in respect of gender and pay. The data demonstrates that diversity is valued in the OPDC workforce. The CEO has made this a priority since the OPDC was established. In addition, while OPDC is a relatively small organisation, the data shows that we have made great progress in gender and pay.

The data reflects full-time staff. As of 31 March 2016 there were no part-time staff in employment at OPDC. OPDC is supportive of requests for flexible working arrangements, and will seriously consider all requests made by staff.

 

Table 1: overall gender pay gap, all staff

  Mean hourly pay Median hourly pay
Female       £26.60 £23.58
Male £24.28 £23.95

Pay gap

-9.54% 1.57%

Quartile summary

The quartile data has been calculated in accordance with the methodology as set out in the Mandatory Gender Pay Gap Reporting – Public Sector Employers Government Consultation document. It recommends that:

Employers will need to calculate their quartile data by dividing the workforce into four equal sized groups. These four groups will be separated according to the hourly pay rate, starting from lowest paid to the highest paid. This approach has been adopted in preference to calculating quartiles by dividing the overall pay distribution into four equal proportions.  Splitting the data in equal groups by salary range could result in very small groups e.g. an entire quartile based on the Chief Executive’s salary.

Using quartiles enables a clear overview of the earnings distribution between men and women in an organisation.

The tables below show the quartile breakdown by gender for the OPDC. These tables contain information as of 31 March 2016.

In tables 2 and 3 below, the data indicates that female staff at OPDC are consistently earning more than men except in quartile 3 where there is no imbalance. This is more apparent at Senior Management level. Overall this is reflective of a workforce where females are well represented across the earnings distribution profile, including the most senior level within the organisation. 

This data indicates that OPDC is in a good position in respect of gender and pay, in comparison to the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE).

 

Table 2: mean hourly pay

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
Quartile 1 £16.31 4 £9.40 1 -73.48%
Quartile 2 £22.47 2 £21.36 3 -5.19%
Quartile 3 £26.55 2 £26.55 2 0%
Quartile 4 £43.10 3 £33.83 2 -27.38%

Table 3: median hourly pay

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
Quartile 1 £16.10 4 £9.40 1 -71.31%
Quartile 2 £22.47 2 £21.36 3 -5.19%
Quartile 3 £26.55 2 £26.55 2 0%
Quartile 4 £45.78 3 £33.83 2 -35.31%

Grade summary

OPDC has chosen to analyse gender pay in relation to its grading structure as it believes that this level of analysis provides a more in depth look at the distribution of pay across the organisation. This level of examination can highlight issues which may be masked by the higher level analysis arising from the overall and quartile data. 

Tables 4 and 5 below show that there are more females on lower grades, specifically Grade 6. However, at the senior Grades 14 and 15 there are more females than males represented. The grading structure has a progression model which includes pay spines within each grade. This means that there is progression on an annual basis. There is no progression beyond the celling of respective grade.

 

Table 4: mean hourly pay by grade

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
London Living Wage n/a 0 £9.40 1 n/a
Grade 6 £16.31 4 n/a 0 n/a
Grade 8 £22.47 2 £21.36 3 -5.19%
Grade 9 £26.55 2 £26.55 2 0%
Grade 10 £28.63 1 £28.63 1 0%
Grade 13 n/a 0 £39.04 1 n/a
Grade 14 £45.78 1 n/a 0 n/a
Grade 15 £54.89 1 n/a 0 n/a

Table 5: median hourly pay by grade

  Female Male Pay Gap
  Hourly rate Number of staff Hourly rate Number of staff  
London Living Wage n/a 0 £9.40 1 n/a
Grade 6 £16.10 4 n/a 0 n/a
Grade 8 £22.47 2 £21.36 3 -5.19%
Grade 9 £26.55 2 £26.55 2 0%
Grade 10 £28.63 1 £28.63 1 0%
Grade 13 n/a 0 £39.04 1 n/a
Grade 14 £45.78 1 n/a 0 n/a
Grade 15 £54.89 1 n/a 0 n/a

£10,000 salary bands summary

In addition, the OPDC is also publishing the distribution of salaries across female and male staff in £10,000 increments up to £100,000, with those earning over £100,000 in one group. This mirrors information published in the Mayor’s Annual Report. These tables contain information as of 31 March 2016 and do not include any of the OPDC Board and Committee Member appointments.

 

Table 6: Distribution by gender in £10,000 increments





Number of staff by salary
  Female Male Total
  Number of staff Number of staff Number of staff
less than £20,001 0 1 1
£20,001 to £30,000 0 0 0
£30,001 to £40,000 4 0 4
£40,001 to £50,000 2 3 5
£50,001 to £60,000 3 3 6
£60,001 to £70,000 0 0 0
£70,001 to £80,000 0 1 1
£80,001 to £90,000 1 0 1
£90,001 to £100,000 0 0 0
£100,001 and over 1 0 1

Salary breakdowns

Table 7 shows the data broken down into equally sized salary groupings. These tables contain information as of 31 March 2016.

The data shows that females are well represented across the groups with the exception of group 3. However, the difference in this group is marginal, with one male and no females. 

As part of its key priorities the OPDC will continue to monitor gender and pay. Organisational best practice will be maintained to ensure that the progress made with gender and pay is upheld.   

Please note that the information in this table is not related to the OPDC’s pay and grading structure.

Table 7: Salary distribution by gender

  Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Totals
  £18,135 - £40,074.50 £40,074.50 - £62,014.01 £62,014.22 - £83,953.51 £83,953.52 - £105.893
Female 4 5 0 2 11
Male 1 6 1 0 8
Totals 4 11 1 2 19

The Mandatory Gender Pay Gap Reporting – Public Sector Employers Government Consultation document highlights the requirement for public authorities to publish the difference between mean and median bonus payments paid to men and women. The OPDC does not operate a bonus scheme and therefore no data is available for this metric.

What's next

The national gender pay gap for all workers is reported as 19.2%, as published in the 2015 Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), and 16.3% for London. The London data is derived from the 2015 ASHE.

This information will be updated annually with data from the ‘snapshot’ date each year. Currently, the Government is consulting with public authorities on a proposal for the snapshot to be 5 April each year, with the data having to be published no later than 4 April the following year.

Read this as a PDF

This full report is also available as a PDF: OPDC gender pay gap report - March 2016 data.