Assembly calls for minute's silence to remember victims of Munich Games

20 June 2012

The London Assembly today called on the Mayor to ensure the victims of the 1972 Munich Olympic terrorist attacks are remembered during the 2012 Games.

In a unanimously agreed motion, Assembly Members expressed their support for a minute’s silence in the Olympic Park during either the opening or closing ceremonies.  This year marks the 40th anniversary of the murder of eleven members of the Israeli team by Palestinian terrorists and is the tenth Olympic Games since the attack.    

Andrew Dismore AM, who proposed the motion, said:

“It is 40 years since this terrible attack took place and there has not once been a memorial service or event officially part of the scheduled events at Olympic Games.  This is simply not good enough. 

“The IOC say to have a minute’s silence to commemorate these victims of terrorism would be a ‘political gesture’ but surely not having a minute’s silence is, in itself, the political gesture.  This is not about the nationality of the victims – they were Olympians. 

“Today this Assembly sends a clear message that we want a minute’s reflection during the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and we call on Mayor Boris Johnson to press the IOC to respect the wish of the host city.”

Roger Evans AM, who seconded the motion, said:

“The 2012 Games should include an opportunity to remember the victims of the attacks in Munich. The IOC needs to show some political courage and allow the commemoration of a tragedy that affected their guests during their event in their venue forty years ago. This important decision should not be dictated by a small number of their members.”

The full text of the motion reads:

“This Assembly notes the widespread, cross-party, support for one minute's silence during the London Olympic Games to mark the 10th Olympiad since and 40th anniversary of the terrorist massacre of Israeli competitors and their coaches during the 1972 Munich Olympics.

“This Assembly urges the Mayor of London to use his position and influence to ensure an official minute's silence remembrance is observed in the Olympic Park during the Opening or Closing Ceremonies of the London Olympic Games.”

Notes for editors:

  1. Watch the webcast.
  2. As well as investigating issues that matter to Londoners, the London Assembly acts as a check and a balance on the Mayor.